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Resolve to give more to others this year

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionEvery year, thousands of people set out to make a New Year’s resolution. Here is a different thought and a different direction we should all try. Instead of giving up chocolate, fatty foods or maybe something as little as how much television we watch, let’s try a different approach. Let’s just give. We can get caught up in our busy schedules and at times lose our focus on what is really important. Let us take the time to think of all who are around us. Even if it’s something as simple as holding a door open, picking up something that someone has dropped, or just being polite by saying hello, there are all kinds acts that can make a difference in a person’s day. When we go home, let us think of our husbands, wives, children, parents or whoever else may be there. Instead of having our own favorite meal, maybe we could consider what others might like instead. Another nice gesture would be to clean up after dinner instead of having someone else do the task. I could list a hundred different ideas on what kind of thoughtful acts we could perform, but that’s up to the individual.The important thing is to think of others. Do no wait, because there’s going to be a time when our loved ones will not always be here. So during the new year, put others first and remember that it’s much better to give than to receive.Sean DefresneAmsterdamMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationlast_img read more

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Town needs affordable housing for seniors

first_imgRotterdam is a nice place to live. Its residents are mostly folks that are getting older or families. I’ve lived here all my life. All around, new apartments are going up — most of them for “seniors” or those “over 55.” That’s great, but most senior citizens can’t afford them. Although some can, let’s focus on the masses who can’t. We live on a very limited income and usually are alone. You really expect a senior to afford $1,200 and up for an apartment? Where do the food, prescriptions and other daily living necessities come in? We worked hard all our lives. Why can’t contractors find it in good conscience to think of the elderly? We are quiet, no parties, no police. We just want to be able to call someplace our home and live our lives there. How about building new apartments for the seniors in Rotterdam that are affordable? Really affordable. Most of us have had to sell our homes or give them up. This would be so wonderful for those that need a place to live.Karen EpliteRotterdam More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

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Catching the DIRFT

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Business parks: Mind the gap

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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More developers hit by sequential approach

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Bull markets have taken the shine off equities, but property looks good

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MEPC factory outlet move

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Constitutional Court probes why KPK bill got speedy treatment

first_imgIt took the House, notorious for its poor legislative productivity, just 13 working-days from the time the bill was submitted to the time it was endorsed. The move provoked massive demonstrations in Jakarta, tinged with violence, as protesters said the House was conspiring with the government to kill the KPK. President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo met with a group of activists that month, saying he would not sign the bill into law and that when the bill would automatically become law without his signature after one month, he would consider issuing an executive order to annul it.He never did.Six groups have sent different petitions to the court demanding the law be annulled. They represent former commissioners of the antigraft agency, activists, university lecturers and students. They took different angles, some claiming the legislative process was flawed, others raised problems with the substance of the new law. Topics : The Constitutional Court is questioning why the House of Representatives gave the bill to reform the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK), which was widely opposed by the public, a reading-speed record in September.The court, which is hearing a petition from seven different groups to revoke the law, asked the House on Monday to provide the recording of the House’s deliberations, the full transcripts and the attendance list of House members.The new law came into effect in October, rendering the commission ineffective without independence and without the tools it once had in fighting graft. The new law created a new layer above the commission, called the supervisory council, with the power to veto.center_img The court, the last hope to save the old KPK, decided to hear all seven petitions at once, looking at the procedure and the substance of the legislation.On Monday, judge Wahiduddin Adams, a member of the six-judge panel, expressed skepticism about how the House could have completed the bill in 13 days.“If lawmakers had worked day and night, it is fine,” he told the hearing attended by representatives of the petitioners and lawyers of the government and the House.The court would also look into how much public consultation the House engaged in while deliberating over the bill, including whether it consulted the commissioners of the antigraft agency.Wahiduddin questioned why President Jokowi did not sign the bill into law, which he saw as an anomaly.  “The President had promised to review the bill. What happened? The government should explain it to the public,” he said.He noted that the last time this happened was in 2003 when then president Megawati Soekarnoputri refused to sign a bill on advocacy. In 2002, Megawati also refused to sign a broadcasting bill.On the substance of the new law, the panel of judges questioned the role of the new supervisory council that it said overlaps with the work of the police and the Attorney General’s Office, which also investigate corruption cases.Agus Hariadi, the lawyer representing the government, said the new law complied with the United Nations Convention against Corruption treaty. Representing the House, Arteria Dahlan denied the petitioners’ claim of a lack of public consultation in deliberating over the bill, pointing out that the discussions went as far back as 2008.Arteria questioned the legal standing of all seven groups of plaintiffs in filing the petitions with the court since their work had no direct relation to the new law.“While we respect every citizen’s right, we should respect the sanctity of the court. Only petitioners who have legal standing and qualified material should be allowed,” he said.A lawyer for one of the petitioners, Saor Siagiana, however, said any citizen had the legal right to oppose the new law “because corruption affects us all”. (mfp)last_img read more

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Police find marijuana field along Papua-PNG border

first_imgKeerom Police discovered on Saturday a 1-hectare marijuana field in Waris district, Keerom regency, Papua, which shares a border with Papua New Guinea.”The field has been cleared of plants and we have arrested the owner,” Papua Police spokesperson Sr. Comr. Ahmad Mustofa Kamal said in a statement on Sunday as quoted by kompas.com.He added that the field owner had been identified as 48-year-old Laurens Swo, a farmer who lives near the marijuana field. Read also: Conservative Aceh proposes cannabis legalizationPolice personnel found 56 cannabis trees measuring 1.5 to 3 meters high. They also seized one machete, one air rifle, a bow and five arrows during Saturday’s operation.”Our personnel have uprooted the marijuana plants. We also questioned the suspect at Keerom Police headquarters,” Kamal said. Police charged Laurens under Law No. 35/2009 on narcotics, which carries a maximum punishment of 20 years’ imprisonment and a fine of Rp 8 billion (US$582,000). (eyc) Topics :last_img read more

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Which countries are affected by coronavirus in Europe?

first_imgSWEDENOne case was registered at the end of January in a woman who had visited the Wuhan area. On Wednesday a second virus case was discovered. GEORGIAGeorgia on Wednesday announced the first confirmed case of the novel coronavirus in the South Caucasus region. With 12 deaths and 400 people infected, Italy is the European country worst-hit by the COVID-19 outbreak. It has also been a point of contagion with many cases in other countries involving people who returned home after travelling in infection-hit areas of northern Italy. AUSTRIAA young Italian couple have tested positive. The Innsbruck hotel where the woman worked as a receptionist was initially placed in quarantine but the measure was lifted on Wednesday following tests. Austria has also urged its nationals to avoid visiting affected areas of neighboring Italy.  Topics : BRITAINSo far, 13 cases recorded since the start of the epidemic. The government has requested travellers returning from affected areas in northern Italy, China, South Korea and Iran to isolate themselves and inform the authorities. GREECE  Athens announced its first infection on Wednesday, a woman aged 38 who had recently returned from northern Italy. On Tuesday, the Greek government said that in the event of a mass outbreak, it would activate temporary restrictions on travel to and from countries with a large number of infections as well as temporarily closing schools, places of worship, cinemas, theatres, sports halls and businesses. BELGIUMOne case detected in a Belgian national who was repatriated from Wuhan, the Chinese city at the center of the epidemic, in early February. He has completed his quarantine period. ITALY  FINLANDTwo cases, the first detected in a Chinese tourist in Lapland, while a second case involving a Finnish national who had recently visited northern Italy was confirmed on Wednesday.  NORTH MACEDONIAOne case in a woman who recently return from a month in Italy.  FRANCE France has so far registered 18 infections and two deaths, and has urged its nationals to delay any plans to visit virus hotspots in northern Italy. Students returning from China, Singapore, South Korea and the Italian regions of Lombardy and Venice are being asked to remain at home for two weeks after their return.  With governments scrambling to contain a slew of coronavirus cases popping up across Europe, here is an overview of the countries affected, where people have died and the precautions being taken.  GERMANYIn Germany, 18 people have been infected including two diagnosed on Tuesday. One is a 25-year-old man who was “presumably infected in Italy, in the city of Milan”.  SPAINThe same has happened in Spain, which has registered 12 cases, 10 of which have been detected since Monday night. Of that number, nine involved Italians or people who had recently visited Italy. Among that number are four Italians who were visiting Tenerife in the Canary Islands, with the hotel where they were staying placed in quarantine To curb the spread, Madrid has advised against travel in northern Italy and sought to identify other potential cases that may have slipped under the radar by testing those already in hospital with respiratory problems or returning from high-risk areas with flu-like symptoms.  CROATIAThree people have tested positive. Among them are a young man who recently stayed in Italy and his brother, while a third case was detected on Wednesday in a man who works in the Italian city of Parma. SWITZERLANDA first case detected on Tuesday in a man in his 70s who was infected near Milan.last_img read more