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Harvard yield hits 82 percent

first_imgEighty-two percent of students admitted to the Class of 2017 plan to enroll at Harvard this August despite the cancellation of Visitas, the popular and long-standing introduction for admitted students to the Harvard experience. This is the highest yield since the Class of 1973 entered approximately two generations ago. The yield for the Class of 2016 was 80.2 percent.Visitas was scheduled to be held April 20-22, but the search for the remaining Boston Marathon bombing suspect forced Harvard officials to cancel the program following a security lockdown of the Greater Boston area.“Even at this difficult time, our undergraduates immediately reached out to prospective members of the Class of 2017 through social media, demonstrating a spontaneous devotion to Harvard that had a powerful effect on students’ decisions to come to Harvard,” said William R. Fitzsimmons, dean of admissions and financial aid. “Their concern for the students who were unable to visit Harvard was evident – and their outreach was especially appreciated, given the extraordinary circumstances of the tragedy that had occurred in Boston. The grace under pressure of our undergraduates was inspiring to all of us here at Harvard as well as to the new members of the Class of 2017.”Harvard students made YouTube videos that showcased student groups and dormitories, including Wigglesworth Hall and Dunster House. The Harvard-Radcliffe Veritones and the Institute of Politics participated, and the Office of Admissions itself created its own virtual welcoming video.The Admissions Office coordinated this activity via its website, email, and the Class of 2017 Facebook group created earlier in the year.  It also offered five Google+ student panels on study abroad, residential life (featuring student bloggers), advice from the Senior Class Committee, multicultural perspectives, and the freshman experience. Harvard students, faculty, and staff used the #virtualvisitas hashtag on Twitter to connect with admitted students and answer their many questions.Leading the Admissions Office virtual outreach was Amy Lavoie, director of digital communications. Administrative Director Vaughn Waters, Grace Cheng, and Mary Magnuson were also important in establishing a communications strategy that allowed Harvard admissions staff to reach other Harvard administrators and to keep prospective members of the Class of 2017 fully informed of events transpiring in the Cambridge and Boston areas.Students on the Undergraduate Admissions Council, the Undergraduate Minority Recruitment Program, and the Harvard Financial Aid Initiative redoubled their efforts after the cancellation of Visitas by once again calling and emailing students and hosting those who were able to visit Cambridge after the lockdown was lifted.The 15,000 alumni interviewing volunteers around the world also reached out to admitted students by telephone, email, and hastily arranged local meetings.  Admissions staff, other administrators, and even Adams House Co-Master Sean Palfrey met stranded students at the airport during the lockdown to assist them with hotel arrangements and transportation. Dean of Administration and Finance Leslie Kirwan was able to reach out to Massport officials, who responded by creating an impromptu meeting area the students quickly named “Terminas.”“We can never thank our alumni, faculty, and staff enough for all they did over the past two weeks and throughout the year,” said Marlyn E. McGrath, director of admissions.  “But we are particularly grateful to the co-directors of Visitas, Michael Esposito and Amelia Muller, assisted by Jake Foley, Bryce Gilfillian, and Tia Ray, who played a critical role in shifting Visitas to a virtual visiting experience.”The contributions they made will form the basis for innovations to be used in recruiting the Class of 2018.  Already the admissions staff is on the road visiting 60 cities with travel partners Duke, Georgetown, Penn, and Stanford.Financial aid was a crucial consideration for a large segment of those enrolling in the Class of 2017.  “Harvard’s financial aid program has been greatly enhanced in recent years, opening the doors as never before to low- and middle-income students,” said Sarah C. Donahue, director of financial aid.This coming year, Harvard will spend $182 million on undergraduate financial aid.  Seventy percent of Harvard students receive some type of financial aid.  Almost 60 percent of Harvard students receive need-based grants, and the average annual cost to their families is $12,000. Twenty percent of Harvard families have annual incomes of $65,000 or less and have no expected parental contribution.Families with incomes from $65,000 to $150,000 and with typical assets pay from zero to 10 percent of their annual incomes, and families with higher incomes can still receive need-based aid depending on individual circumstances, including having multiple children in college or unusual medical expenses.Students are not required to take out loans, and home equity is not used in determining financial aid.  As always, students are asked to contribute toward the cost of their own education by working 10 to 12 hours per week during the school year and obtaining a summer job.“The Financial Aid Office was open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays during April, and we were able to reassure anxious students that Harvard remains affordable during these difficult financial times. None of this would have been possible without the commitment of Michael D. Smith, dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Evelynn M. Hammonds, dean of Harvard College, and Drew Faust, president of Harvard University,” said Donahue.At this time, men make up 52.4 percent of the class. Prospective social science concentrators constitute 28.3 percent, with 24.3 percent interested in the biological sciences, 18 percent in the humanities, 13.3 percent in engineering and computer science, 8.4 percent in the physical sciences, 7 percent in mathematics, and 0.7 percent undecided.  African-Americans make up 9.4 percent of the class, Asian-Americans 20.9 percent, Latinos 10 percent, and Native Americans and Native Hawaiians 2.3 percent.  International students constitute 11.1 percent of the class.This year’s high yield means that the Class of 2017 is currently full. It is possible that later this month or in June a small number will be admitted from the waiting list.Harvard’s yield is particularly notable because the College does not offer athletic or other non-need-based scholarships. In addition, Harvard’s Early Action program, unlike binding Early Decision programs, allows admitted students to apply elsewhere and asks only that they reply by May 1 after comparing other offers of admission and financial aid.  Such freedom and flexibility give students more time to choose the college that provides the best match, a contributing factor to Harvard’s nearly 98 percent graduation rate.“The Class of 2017 was chosen through the most selective admissions process in Harvard’s history — from a record applicant pool in excess of 35,000,” said Fitzsimmons.  “But beyond these statistics, their strong personal qualities and character shone through during the challenging days of the aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing and the uncertainties surrounding the cancellation of Visitas. Because of these experiences and the bonding that took place among future classmates at the airport and through social media, we have high expectations that they will prove to be a memorable Harvard Class.”last_img read more

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Student election upcoming

first_imgThe National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) acceptance of an election agreement between Harvard University and the Harvard Graduate Student Union-United Auto Workers (HGSU-UAW) clears the way for eligible students to vote Nov. 16 and 17 on whether they want the union to represent them on issues related to employment.This election follows a recent NLRB ruling that students in teaching and research positions at private universities can now be considered employees for the purpose of forming a labor union. Harvard students supporting unionization decided last year to affiliate with the UAW to form the HGSU-UAW. While students at other private universities also are organizing as a result of the NLRB decision, it appears that Harvard will be the first private university to vote following the NLRB action.An estimated 3,500 Harvard graduate and undergraduate students, across 11 Schools and more than 50 programs, are eligible to vote because they are in teaching or research positions. Undergraduate research assistants are not included. Students will cast secret ballots at locations in Cambridge, Allston, and the Longwood Medical Area, and the NLRB will manage the election. Students eligible to vote will receive information on where and when they can do so.“Only students eligible for union representation will be voting in this election,” said Harvard University Provost Alan M. Garber. “But the entire Harvard community should understand the importance of this vote. The results of this election will have consequences for our community for years to come. So we all have a responsibility to encourage full, open, and informed discussion.”The election will be decided by a majority of students who actually vote, not a majority of those eligible to vote. According to NLRB rules, if a simple majority of voters choose to unionize, then all individuals in positions covered by the bargaining unit would be represented by the union. There is no way an individual student can “opt out” of union representation.If the students vote to unionize, the University and HGSU-UAW would negotiate one contract to cover the approximately 3,500 students in the bargaining unit on “wages, hours, and other terms and conditions of employment.” However, it is not clear what subjects would be considered negotiable, since the NLRB has not provided guidance in this area.At New York University (NYU), the only private university that chose to recognize a student union prior to the NLRB ruling, the union covers less than half the number of students who could be covered at Harvard. Among student unions in the United States, the breadth of the proposed HGSU-UAW bargaining unit appears to be unprecedented.“The time to ask questions and seek answers is now, before a single vote is cast,” said Garber. “Since all eligible students will be bound by the results, the day after the election is too late. We encourage students to examine the issues that matter most to them and cast informed votes.”last_img read more

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BRO Athletes: John Robinson Takes on the The Old Dominion 100-Miler

first_imgMan, after all the months of preparation it’s good to be finally out here doing it, actually underway. It’s a lovely morning and I’ve got 24 miles under my belt since the 4:00 A.M. predawn start. All systems seem to be humming along smoothly; my mental state could be described as –perhaps unrealistically– buoyed optimism. This section of the course traverses country lanes through farmsteads nestled in narrow Fort Valley, Virginia. Fog shrouds the pastures and ponds. I hope it lingers long enough for me to get out of the open and into the shade of the trails again; I can do without an overdose of summer sun beating down on me. It’s warm and humid already.I’m approaching the St. David’s Church aid station. Hmmm what do I need? I think I’ll take on some more fruit like strawberries and orange slices, watermelon if they have it.I’m running the thirty-eighth edition of the Old Dominion 100-Miler. Held on what’s usually “the first truly hot and humid day of the season,” the OD100 is the oldest race of its kind in the United States. I’ve wanted to do it from the first time I heard about it. Besides featuring a beautiful and varied course, the race has a down-home feel to it. It’s still run by the family that organized it in 1978.So I’ve been running for four hours now. Out of the gate at the Shenandoah County Fairgrounds in Woodstock I loped with the 57 other race starters. Headlamps bobbing through the town and into the night, the excitement hanging in the air with the humidity. I chatted with folks on the long climb up Woodstock Tower Road; I realized, as the field stretched inexorably apart, that soon I’d be solo and chatting would be something I’d mainly be doing with myself. I felt good, looking forward to the day’s challenges.I’m alone now; it’s quiet and peaceful, my footfalls and birdsong the primary noises. I’ve seen some lovely stretches of trail such as the lavender trail where I was passed from one Whipporwill to the next. I’ve visited several aid stations by now, including the first crew-accessible one where my Marybeth gave me the most important aid of all: a smile and encouragement. And, oh yeah by the way, at mile 22 I had to “squat behind a tree,” something that I’d rather not fool with but when you’ve gotta go…As always I did feel better afterwards, but the chafing that would result from it would come back to haunt me.I’m bib number 77. I grinned when the race headquarters check-in girl gave it to me, ’cause 77 is one of my all time favorite numbers. And I’m always looking for good omens, especially when it comes to running 100 (!) miles.I’m trotting up to the deserted farmhouse that serves as backdrop to the St. David’s Church aid station. A woman greets me and I offer exclamations of the beauty of the setting. She smiles, tells me she’s worked this spot for 18 years, and introduces me to her helper, a teenage girl who turns out to be the race founder’s granddaughter. After checking me in –bib number and time arrived– and ensuring that my hands are full of fruit they send me off.Time flows on. I’m almost at a landmark aid station, Four Points, at mile 32.5. As it comes into view I hear the hustle and bustle of the place, and some clapping and cheers when they see me. (Do ya think I love that?) My crew Marybeth jumps into action, pouring cold water from a gallon jug over my head as I stoop over, mouth full of apple. Ahhh, so helpful.A few hours of demanding work, not to mention some anguish, brings me back to Four Points again; the course circles back through at mile 48. In the meantime I had transited, among other places, the steep and technical climb through Duncan Hollow and up over Scotchorne Gap. Among the rocks of Duncan Hollow a strikingly gorgeous Timber rattlesnake lay across the trail –in greeting, I optimistically mused. I had also paused briefly at Crisman Road aid station, where not only did I nab a grape FreeziePop, but luckily passed the medical check performed there.IMG_1705At my second pass through Four Points Marybeth announces with a smile, “almost halfway!” I smile too but inside I whine, “Don’t remind me! I feel like I’ve put out monumental effort already! And you mean to tell me I’m not even halfway?” But I don’t say that, just think it.On the long Moreland Gap climb I cross a line painted on the fire road that’s labeled, “50 Miles.” Yeah, that’s good news but, like I said… I’m running with Erik at this point, and we end up running about four hours together. On the lengthy crank to Edinburg Gap we come across another rattler, this one a big Eastern Diamondback. He’s coiled in a substantial pile, rattling loudly enough to almost shake the leaves off the trees. We give him a wide berth and excitedly move on, enjoying the bonus energy boost that reptile provided us.The OD 100 course is intricate. One could get lost. I had spent weeks studying maps, plotting the course and memorizing aid station locations. On the day before the race Marybeth and I drove the sections of the route that we could get to. Having those images in my mind would turn out to be a big help; upping my confidence level and peace of mind –things you just can’t get enough of in a long race.The OD 100 has a testy little time limit I’m thinking about. In order to cop one of the coveted sterling silver race belt buckles one has to finish in under 24 hours. On one long, drawn-out climb I determine that it took me 11.5 hours to reach the halfway point, therefore making it almost impossible to finish the race in under 24 hours, given the assumption that it would take me considerably longer to complete the second half. Rats. A while later I realize that actually I had reached the halfway point in 9.5 hours. I still have a good chance at sub 24…just gotta keep it all together and not fade too much as the race progresses. I’m still in the game.“What can I get you!?” the kind volunteer at Edinburg Gap asks. “Chocolate Milk!” I blurt out, certainly not expecting them to really have it. “Sorry,” he says, as I gratefully palm a half turkey cheese sub instead. Just as I’m departing a guy shoves a small bottle of chocolate milk into my other hand. “From my private stock!” He grins.My right shoulder is bothering me considerably now, and my hydration pack really aggravates it, so while I can I trade Marybeth my pack for a handheld 20-ounce bottle instead. The change is good; I just can’t carry as much water as with my pack. I’ll drink more at the aid stations.The section of race course from mile 54 to 60 follows a rugged off-road-vehicle trail. I’m thinking that it isn’t so great that such vehicles are tearing through the national forest like that until three big knobby-tired Jeeps crawl past and I change my tune. Now it’s hey that looks like fun!Ok, so I’m getting weary, I hesitate to admit. There is an abundance of discomfort on many fronts. My mind is busy managing the load, keeping things light and positive. “I feel great, and I feel grateful!” “Light, easy, glide…strong.” A good thing, among many actually, is that my new shorts seem to be working very well, in reference to the below-the-belt chafing I’m used to. My old CWX compression shorts/Nike shorts combo worked well for a couple of years but recently started to chafe me bad during races and even long training runs. I won a pair of Patagonia shorts at the Promise Land 50k two months ago and they seemed, well, promising. After getting chafed to pieces in the Massanutten Mountain 100-miler three weeks ago, I decided to make the switch. So far so good.I mentioned running the MMT100 three weeks ago. That’s right, bucking conventional thinking that says it’s impossible to run two 100-milers only three weeks apart I decided to go for it. Actually, I have been planning this for months, and I knew intuitively and practically that I could do it, barring any disaster incurred in the MMT. I just really wanted to do both races. And I’ve learned that you don’t just try to run a big ultra, you plan and train and work hard to do it. On this the burly Old Dominion 100 I know it’s crucial to ignore that annoying small voice inside me that wants to say, “You can’t run another 100 now, and certainly not without at least taking a major hit in your performance.” Hmmm…Don’t worry, I’m not listening to that.Along the OD 100 course, in the more remote sections, are several self-serve, unattended aid stations, such as at Peach Orchard and Peter’s Mill Pond. These consist of welcoming little caches of water jugs and a cooler or two full of food, along with some written info on the location and which and how far to the next aid station. A pleasant sight for weary eyes and hungry stomachs.I’m rolling into Little Fort aid station, one I’ve been particularly looking forward to since friends are staffing it. And wow, a big bonus is that son Ian is here grinning in greeting alongside Marybeth. I load up on food including an over-the-top hot dog on bun drenched in mustard, ketchup, and relish. Yum, what a morale booster. I can make it to Elizabeth Furnace now, I’m thinking as I head out after the requisite send off of cold-water-over-my-head treatment.It’s raining lightly now. Warm, humid, and raining. It feels ok; it’s a nice change. Between Mudhole Gap and Elizabeth Furnace there are a half dozen significant creek crossings to slog through, and if you think this is the first point in the race that my feet have gotten wet and muddy you’re wrong. They’ve remained that way since early on; it’s unavoidable but no big deal thankfully. I knew and accepted long before the race began the fact that my feet would be devastated.I’ve been at it for almost 16 hours as I come into the vicinity of the EF aid station. A quick medical check –I pass, rats I guess I have to keep going– and my crew is taking care of me. They give me food, (grilled cheese and strawberries), and my headlamp, but best of all they give me… Ian! The OD 100 staff encourages racers to use a “safety runner” on the grueling 12-mile Sherman’s Climb and Veach Gap portion, commencing from Elizabeth Furnace, mile 74.9. That is, have a fresh, companion runner along. Ian is willing and able, and laces up his shoes and takes off with me into the gathering darkness. As we get established on the climb Ian, as hoped for, distracts me with crazy stories and helps keep me moving. In those hours of pitch black, on rough trail, we move steadily, time suspended, just the two of us. Anybody else in this race? I wonder. Anyway, at last check I was in fifth or sixth place overall, but anything can happen now. The trail at the base of the mountain spits us out at Veach West, mile 86.6. Ian bids me adieu and I continue on as best as I can, solo once again.I’ve observed that although long hours of running difficult terrain results in physical fatigue and other obvious physical effects, mental acuity actually does not seem degraded. It’s as if the body ensures that optimal –indeed elevated– brain function is maintained for just as long as possible, since survival of the organism –me in this case!– may well depend upon it. Tactical decisions are being made, precise musculoskeletal movement must be preserved. So…even though I’m tired as I continue to endure after twenty plus hours, I’m not sleepy. For my mind it’s still “game on.”At mile 90.9, after getting uncomfortably up close and personal with myself for another hour or so, I arrive at the race’s last crew-accessible aid station, and my steadfast Marybeth and the outpost’s lone volunteer dispense, besides warm chicken noodle soup, good cheer and smiles. But other than that it’s a grim place. Into the pouring rain I push on.Waves of doubt have washed over me before on this run, and I’m feeling it again now. And again I struggle to keep my head above it, to keep from sputtering and drowning in the despair. The rain is falling steadily; it’s coursing down my face, down my body, mixing with sweat, blood, mud. The darkness enshrouds me. It’s profound, and my headlamp casts but a feeble glow. But it comforts me to see the occasional chemlight hanging in a tree to help mark the race course, and seeing the dim light of one of those “glow sticks” up ahead on the relentless climb up Woodstock Tower Road fans an ember within me. It’s going to take a lot more than a few scattered, pitiful feelings to shut me down, I declare for the umpteenth time.I’m headed down down the mountain towards the town of Woodstock and the finish. I pass the sign indicating that I’m leaving the George Washington National Forest. As late race bonus fun I have to squat and do my business again. That’s right, and it ain’t pretty. Ugg. Oh yes, there is considerable rawness throughout my nether regions, but I can ignore that for now.I’m jogging across the Shenandoah River at Burnshire Dam. I’m passing wheat fields host to silent, pulsating lightning bugs. I’m entering lanes lined with houses. I’m descending a hill that brings me to the edge of town. I’m trotting through sleeping Woodstock. Time to stop this foolishness.As I enter the fairgrounds and head to the finish I can’t really believe it’s happening. I run under the FINISH banner, and the lonely timekeeper and Marybeth welcome me. There’s no one else around. It’s quiet; no bells, no cheering crowd. Just the drizzle and the end of a very long day. I’ve finished the Old Dominion 100-Miler in 22:35:17, in fifth place overall. Out of the 58 starters 31 would finish, 13 of us under 24 hours.Marybeth and I crawl to our tent. I’m wracked with stiffness, cramps, blisters and more, but I’m happy. I finished the Old Dominion 100 and I see life as very wide and very deep and very good.BROAthleteBannerAdlast_img read more

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Abrams: Conditions for December Elections in Venezuela Worse than in 2018

first_imgBy Alejandra Arredondo/Voice of America (VOA)Edited by Diálogo Staff August 31, 2020 Venezuela is now less prepared for free and fair elections than it was in 2018, when the results of the presidential elections were rejected by more than two dozen countries, U.S. Special Representative for Venezuela Elliot Abrams said on July 28.“The conditions for free and fair elections are actually much worse today than they were in May 2018, when [Nicolás] Maduro held the presidential elections,” Abrams said in a phone press conference.The Nicolás Maduro regime has called for new parliamentary elections for December 6, 2020, a measure that the opposition has criticized as another attempt to squelch their political representation.Civil rights groups have denounced the elections, which seek to renew the opposition-controlled National Assembly, as designed to favor the ruling party, the United Socialist Party of Venezuela (PSUV, in Spanish).“The parliamentary elections in December are already rigged,” Abrams said, as he pointed to the National Electoral Council (CNE, in Spanish), an institution under government control designed to regulate elections and whose members were appointed by the Supreme Tribunal of Justice (TSJ, in Spanish).“The CNE […] is supposed to be an independent body […], however, the TSJ stopped negotiations to elect the members and appointed them itself,” Abrams said.U.S. in contact with Norway about VenezuelaThe diplomat also spoke about the visit of Norwegian government representatives, who have attempted to mediate a solution to Venezuela’s crisis. Abrams said that the United States is in contact with Norway and that he has spoken with some Norwegian diplomats.“As for the Norwegians, we are, of course, in contact with Norway, and I’ve spoken to Norwegian diplomats since the return of the group that was in Caracas — a difficult trip for them if you think about it, from Oslo to Caracas in a time of COVID,” he said.“I can’t say that I feel particularly optimistic about this trip, because it seems that the regime has already made up its mind […]; it seems to want to go forward with this phony election,” the U.S. official said.Venezuela and North KoreaThe United Nations (U.N.) warned Maduro that the military agreement with North Korea would violate Security Council regulations. U.N. investigators discovered that Diosdado Cabello himself signed that agreement.In this respect, Abrams said that a violation of U.N. sanctions is potentially serious for the Maduro regime, because many countries would be willing to impose sanctions, although they have not yet done so individually.“It also shows, again, the nature of this regime. We’ve seen recently the regime begin to build its relationship with Iran. Iran, Venezuela, a pair of pariah states. Iran and North Korea now — North Korea and Venezuela. And I think one of the other impacts, besides the potential sanctions themselves, is reminding countries worldwide about the nature of this regime and the partners that it seeks worldwide,” Abrams said.last_img read more

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Long Island Pakistanis Mourn Victims of Taliban School Attack

first_imgView image | gettyimages.com Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Local Pakistanis and faith groups mourning the 145 victims—132 of them children—of a Taliban school attack are planning a candlelight vigil in Mineola on Wednesday evening.The brazen attack shocked the world on Tuesday as reports came in describing how ruthless Taliban gunman stormed the Army Public School and Degree College in Pashawar and indiscriminately sprayed bullets into uniformed children and their teachers.“I could not focus since I heard the news,” said Isma Chaudhry, the president-elect of the Islamic Center of Long Island, who was raised in Lahore. “What is most shameful is that this is all done in the name of religion and these are acts beyond any explanation, beyond any sense, beyond any human understanding.”Pakistani troops who responded to the school described a horrific scene of pools of blood and bullet-ridden bodies of lifeless children scattered on the floor. Some students recalled how the Taliban forced them to watch as their teacher was burned alive. None of the attackers survived the siege.The tragedy shocked Pakistani-born Long Islanders who have been struggling to come to terms with the brutal terrorist attack.“These were children,” Chaudhry added. “I have kids…I just cannot imagine such a horrific, heinous action toward anyone, especially kids.”Bashir Qamar, founder of Pakistani American Community of Long Island, a cultural and social organization, said his group will mourn the dead at a candlelight vigil at the Theodore Roosevelt Executive & Legislative Building in Mineola at 6 p.m. Wednesday.“We were in sudden shock,” he said. “We were speechless. It was such a sad and tragic incident.” Qamar, who is from Karachi, said he was hoping that the Pakistani Army could put an end to the violence.According to reports, the attack was in retaliation for a Pakistani military offensive against the military group on the Afghan border.“There’s no justification, there is nothing,” added Chaudhry. “It’s something you cannot really comprehend.”When she lived in Pakistan, Chaudhry said her family would travel to Pashawar often. She described it as a “major city” that is home to children who take pride in their education. For some Pakistani children, however, school is not an option because families cannot afford the cost of education, she said.“It’s not something that comes in easy or is taken for granted,” she said. “You should see these kids the way they’re dressed up…because they have a lot of pride.” Chaudhry spoke to friends and family back home shortly after the attack. Everyone is “weeping a loss,” she said.She said interfaith groups from across the region have reached out to the ICLI and expressed deep sadness. An interfaith prayer service is expected to be held at the ICLI’s mosque in Westbury Wednesday afternoon to mourn the victims.The devastating attack came less than a week after Malala Yousafzai became the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace prize. Yousafzai survived a Taliban assassination attempt in Pakistan after she was targeted for her pro-education advocacy.“I am heartbroken by this senseless and cold-blooded act of terror in Peshawar that is unfolding before us,” Yousafzai said in a statement. “Innocent children in their school have no place in horror such as this.” View image | gettyimages.comlast_img read more

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Pep Guardiola names the Man City player who should have beaten Liverpool’s Virgil van Dijk to Player of the Year award

first_img About Connatix V67539 Read More Video Settings Rio Ferdinand tells Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop struggling Raheem Sterling was voted the Football Writers’ Player of the Season (Picture: Getty)‘That’s why we have to be more precise in all the aspects we are working with these last three years and try to win the game.‘If they play like the way they play using set-pieces and counter-attacks with their quality players, they are so good but maybe at home the last game they decide to go forward more.‘We talk about what we can expect and how we handle both situations.‘It will be nice if we score first but we analyse Brighton and know how well they defend. Tottenham won in the last minute with a fantastic goal, Arsenal drew when they won 4-2 at Valencia. I know it is always difficult . Just focus on the game we have to play.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Full Screen Manchester United captain Harry Maguire 1 min. story Liverpool defender Virgil van Dijk was crowned PFA Player of the Year last month (Picture: Getty)Manchester City manager Pep Guardiola believes Bernardo Silva would have been a more deserving winner of the PFA Footballer of the Year Award than Liverpool’s Virgil van Dijk.The world’s most expensive defender has been the bedrock upon which Jurgen Klopp’s side have built their Premier League title bid, marshalling a defence which has conceded just 22 goals and kept 20 clean sheets.Silva’s teammate Raheem Sterling, who has scored 17 goals and registered 10 assists, meanwhile, was handed the presitgious Football Writers’ Player of the Year award last week, but Guardiola insists the Portuguese schemer has been the driving force in a side that will retain the title should they win at Brighton on Sunday.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘I don’t vote but Bernardo was the best and not just in our team,’ said Guardiola.ADVERTISEMENT Top articles Skip by Metro Coming Next Metro Sport ReporterFriday 10 May 2019 2:44 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link97Shares Pep Guardiola names the Man City player who should have beaten Liverpool’s Virgil van Dijk to Player of the Year award Read Morecenter_img Advertisement Comment / 1/1 More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City Read More Read More Visit Advertiser website GO TO PAGE SPONSORED Read More Bernardo Silva has been in sensational form for Manchester City this season (Picture: Getty)‘He can play incredibly well everywhere, give me a team and he can play well there. He does everything good.’Brighton preserved their top flight status last weekend after they followed Cardiff’s defeat against Crystal Palace by securing an unlikely 1-1 draw at Arsenal.City were far from at their best when the two teams met last month in an FA Cup final decided by a solitary Gabriel Jesus goal and Guardiola accepts just a single mistake or moment of brilliance could deny City the title.‘It’s a privilege,’ he said. ‘We are in this position because we won a lot of games, 13 in a row, we have to win one more in the Premier League and that is what we have to do.‘I see the team relaxed, training good, smiling a lot, completely focused on the pitch or in meetings. Anything can happen in the game and one mistake of our side or one incredible performance from the opponent, one mistake from the referee can decide the title. PLAY Advertisement Skip Adlast_img read more

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Time to start thinking about interest rate rises: Aegon

first_imgHe said interest rates were unlikely to increase to the level of past decades, but could climb to 1.5% or 2%. The main interest rate for the euro-zone has been 0% since March 2016.Tuch said almost 80% of German government bonds and more than 60% of Dutch government bonds traded against a negative rate. He added that he didn’t expect a profit could be made on government paper during “the coming years”, and argued that Germany’s low interest rate was “simply unsustainable”.The average duration of government bonds was increasing, Tuch added, with some governments issuing paper with an extremely long duration – sometimes 100 years.“Most pension funds will be exposed to this development through their index portfolio,” he added.According to Tuch, interest rates on credit and high yield bonds were also at historic lows, with owners also not prepared for a rate increase.In his opinion, pension funds should consider replacing their liquid bonds with illiquid fixed income investments.“These aren’t bought by the ECB, have a lower bubble potential, and deliver extra returns,” he argued.Tuch cited residential mortgages as an alternative, “as they produce considerably better returns than Dutch government bonds against an acceptable risk-return ratio”.Illiquid corporate loans as well as loans with a government guarantee would also be an alternative to government bonds, he said.Aegon was anticipating the ECB’s policy by going short on Italian interest-rate derivatives and regularly taking profits, Tuch said.Aegon had also cautiously switched to an underweight duration for government bonds, relative to the benchmark. He recommended pension funds follow this example and cash in when interest rates rise.Tuch also suggested that pension funds revise their interest rate hedges, arguing that central clearing of derivatives – as required by EMIR regulations – had “important advantages” relative to bilateral swaps. He said that Aegon AM had already fully switched to central clearing. However, he didn’t elaborate on the advantages.The last time the ECB raised its main interest rate was in 2011, when the rate increased by 25 basis points in April and July, reaching 1.5%. However, it was forced to reverse this move by the end of the year as several euro-zone economies struggled to pay off debt. Pension funds should start considering the impact of an interest rate rise and instruct their asset managers to make adjustments, according to Aegon Asset Management.Without changes, interest rate increases would cause considerable damage to schemes’ portfolios of euro-denominated government bonds, warned Hendrik Tuch, head of interest and money markets at Aegon AM.Speaking at the annual congress of IPE’s Dutch sister publication PensioenPro in Amsterdam last week, he said rates were likely to rise as a consequence of the European Central Bank (ECB) reducing its quantitative easing policy.According to Tuch, Aegon AM expected that the ECB would signal its intentions after the summer. Government bond yields would rise later this year as a result.last_img read more

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Coronavirus: Millions in home sales as virtual reality auctions kick off

first_imgThis post-war home at 43 Sydney Avenue, Camp Hill, sold for $1.062m to a phone bidder hours before the coronavirus inroom auction deadline.Millions exchanged hands this week as agents, buyers and sellers raced to beat the COVID-19 crackdown on inroom property auctions, while others embraced the start of livestreaming sales. In the final hours before the Wednesday midnight inroom deadline, a renovator home in inner Brisbane sold for $1.062m, with more than half of potential buyers bidding over the phone.Bidding opened at $650,000 for the post-war home at 43 Sydney Ave, Camp Hill, and continued for more than 50 minutes, sometimes rising in $1,000s and $5,000 lots before finally selling for $1.062m to a phone bidder.“It sold well above the reserve and the fact that we had seven bidders shows the fundamentals of real estate are still really strong, and with limited properties on the market there are opportunities for sellers because there are genuine buyers out there at the moment looking. We’re still listing and selling property,” Mr McCrea said.More from newsCOVID-19 renovation boom: How much Aussies are spending to give their houses a facelift during the pandemic3 days agoWhizzkid buys almost one property a month during COVID-197 days ago New digital inspections for renters and buyers to combat COVID-19 This is the living room of Brisbane’s latest million-dollar property, with 43 Sydney Avenue, Camp Hill, selling for $1.062m mid-week.Among the virtual sales last night (Thursday) were 10 conducted through Ray White Queensland chief auctioneer Mitch Peereboom on the Gold Coast.“These are online private auctions. Buyers register to bid, they are able to watch the auction live and bid via our platform. We are really excited about this creative solution because we know buyers want to buy and sellers want to sell. The property market is performing strongly and we welcome this new opportunity to deliver our clients the same outcomes (they would have achieved).”Stuart McCrea of Place Estate Agency in Coorparoo said the industry could work around the safety measures introduced to protect buyers and sellers from coronavirus.“The use of video walk-throughs, all these things, allow people to bid with confidence. When your dream home comes up you shouldn’t be worried about coronavirus.” Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:08Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -3:08 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow will COVID-19 compare to other market downturns03:08 QLD property industry already adapting to new ways of operatingcenter_img 210 Long Street East, Graceville, sold for $855,000Ray White Sherwood and Graceville principal Cameron Crouch achieved almost $4m in property sales that were set to go to auction midweek, using virtual technology “with great success”.“We have set up a virtual auction theatre on our new rooftop auction space because it is central for our auctioneer Mitch Peereboom. Wednesday night we sold four from five properties and we have some 28 auctions on the board to be auctioned in coming weeks,” he said. Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced on Tuesday that all inroom auctions and group open homes would cease from midnight Wednesday, leading the industry to take the events fully digital, with bidding done online or over the phone. This week was on course to be the biggest of the year for auctions, with Brisbane volumes up 52.2 per cent, compared with the same time last year, with 172 homes listed to go under the hammer, according to the CoreLogic Auction Market Preview.“After the weekend, we should have a better idea on how this is going to impact the auction market going forward,” a CoreLogic spokesperson said. MORE: Sweeping changes for real estate after coronavirus restrictions 207 Long Street East, Graceville, sold for $705,000“We had 13 registered bidders last night. The first lot was a cracker at 210 Long St East, Graceville, which sold for $855,000. It went so crazy with a tonne of bids flying in. The elderly vendor was a bit nervous but still comfortable in the process and were committed to selling. We have technology processes in place to remain ‘business as usual’ in this new environment of private inspections, virtual inspections and weekly auctions.”Two of the properties sold under the hammer – 210 Long Street East, Graceville, for $855,000 and 207 Long Street East, Graceville, for $705,000. Two sold before auction and a fifth property was passed in. FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON TWITTERlast_img read more

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Sofie Maersk’s Main Engine Breaks Down

first_imgDanish-flagged Post Panamax containership MV Sofie Maersk has suffered a main engine failure on its way to Asia.The 8,160 TEU containership is being moved to Honolulu port to initiate repairs and take provisions, according to the vessel’s operating carrier cited by Hapag-Lloyd on March 8.The containership is fully-laden and its cargo is expected to remain onboard whilst repairs are ongoing.The 1989-built vessel is deployed on Eastbound AC2 service connecting Asia and West Coast South America.The earliest estimated arrival time in Qingdao will be on April 8.Details on the potential cause of the engine failure were not disclosed.Sofie Maersk is owned by Danish Moller Maersk AS and it is worth around USD 17.46 million, data from VesselsValue shows.World Maritime News Stafflast_img

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1 injured in Franklin County accident

first_imgFRANKLIN COUNTY, Ind. — A Union County woman was injured in a single vehicle accident in Franklin County on Monday.The Franklin County Sheriff’s Department responded to a 911 call on St. Mary’s Road near the intersection with Pipe Creek Rd regarding a single vehicle accident.According to police, Beverly Froman, 67, of Liberty was traveling south on St. Mary’s Road.As she was negotiating a curve in the roadway, she saw an oncoming large truck.Froman stated that she applied the brakes, which caused her to lose control of her vehicle due to the wet roadway.Froman’s car went off the east side of the roadway, striking an embankment and a tree.Froman was transported to Margaret Mary Health in Batesville for treatment of her injuries.last_img