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University looks to revise du Lac

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the second and final installment of a two-part series examining the policies and possible revisions of du Lac, the student handbook.Senior John Saulitis has been on both sides of the University’s disciplinary process.He faced the consequences of ResLife himself and used that experience to assist others as a peer advocate.One thing Saulitis has learned is that students who are ResLifed at Notre Dame are not “criminals.”“People make mistakes, and when you make something as rigid as the ResLife process, as du Lac is, you’re going to catch a lot of good people that maybe did something that they regret,” Saulitis said.The University is currently making revisions to du Lac, the student handbook, and student government will make recommendations for changes Monday. If accepted, the recommendations would update du Lac to make it more student-friendly, student body president Grant Schmidt said.Associate Vice President for Residence Life Bill Kirk said du Lac is reviewed every six to eight years, and he characterized this process as a “major” review.The University is evaluating all student life policies for “their effectiveness, consistency and appropriateness with [the University’s] mission,” Kirk said.Schmidt said the most important recommendation will be for the adoption of a medical amnesty policy, which was recently passed in Student Senate.If adopted by the University, the policy would prevent a student seeking medical treatment for a friend from getting in trouble with the Office of Residence Life and Housing (ORLH).The policy would allow ORLH to educate the student, through alcohol classes for example, but the incident would not go on the student’s disciplinary record, Schmidt said.Saulitis agreed that student safety should come before the rules of du Lac.“Maybe that person falls and hurts themselves and there’s parietals. You can’t sit there until the morning if they’ve broke an arm or something like that,” Saulitis said. “Student safety should always come before the rules at Notre Dame.”Kirk said his Office has not yet been provided with details on student government’s suggestion for a medical amnesty policy.Schmidt said student government will also propose that discipline be handled at the most localized level possible. In particular, the recommendation will ask that first offenses be handled at the discretion of the rector.“If you [get in trouble] in Fisher, don’t you think if it’s your first incidence of intoxication, the rector of Fisher should probably call your rector?” Schmidt said.Student body vice president Cynthia Weber said, “Our mentality is that problems should be dealt with at the most localized level. Things that can be handled in dorm often should be handled in dorm.”Breen Phillips Hall rector Rachel Kellogg said many du Lac first-time offenses are handled in the residence halls, and she thinks students are often unaware of this as ORHL and rectors are concerned about privacy issues.“There are a lot of first-time issues that get dealt with in hall that I think a lot of people don’t see,” Kellogg said.Schmidt recognized that many rectors already communicate with each other before taking the discipline to a higher level, but said this policy would make it a requirement that a student’s rector be given the choice to deal with the incident in the dorm.Junior Zach Reuvers has been ResLifed more than once, and he said he sees an inconsistency in the way the University handles some infractions in the dorm and some in ORLH.Reuvers said he was ResLifed for playing beer pong — a drinking game involving shooting ping-pong balls in cups of beer — in his dorm room, but he said he knows of other instances where drinking game violations only levied a hall fine.“The [disciplinary] process in the residence halls needs a clarification,” Reuvers said. “They admitted in my hearing that they don’t typically hear drinking game sanctions unless they are really serious.”Along with the medical amnesty policy, student government is also discussing a recommendation to lift the ban on drinking games, Schmidt said.“I’m not trying to condone underage drinking,” Schmidt said. “But we are trying to address that the general culture on campus has changed.”Weber said drinking games have become a part of the culture, and are often times not abusive.“The genesis of drinking games has gone from drinking games are a way to get drunk, whereas now drinking games are such a part of drinking culture,” Weber said. “Drinking games happen to be a part of the casual drinking culture that is not binge drinking.”Schmidt said the goal is to prevent abusive drinking, and allowing drinking games on campus may help reduce the number of students who go to off-campus parties.“We will recommend that they at least look at that policy because a lot of times students are driven to off-campus parties [because of on-campus alcohol rules],” he said. “We want people to stay on campus.”Kirk said it is unlikely the University will revise du Lac to allow drinking games.“Drinking games are virtually always associated with drinking alcohol to excess and with the intention of becoming intoxicated … I can’t envision a change in our rules or regulations that would in any way moderate the University’s disapproval of such behavior,” he said.Kellogg said drinking games can be problematic in the dorms, especially for freshmen.“Its so easy to get drunk faster than you intend to,” she said.Under student government’s recommendation for a revision of the drinking game ban, the rector would determine whether the drinking game caused students to abuse alcohol, Schmidt said.As a rector, Kellogg said she sees her role in enforcing du Lac as educational.“It’s not just a list of dos and don’ts,” she said. “It’s more about living together in a community that is fair and pleasant for everyone.”In his role as a peer advocate, Saulitis said while every University needs a disciplinary process, he sees some weaknesses in the ResLife system.“I think the biggest problem with ResLife that they’ve gotten to the point where it’s all about the rules and not about the students anymore,” he said.To make the process more “about the students,” Saulitis recommended students work for ORLH and sit on the decision-making panel in administrative hearings.“I think students would be as tough as the people in Reslife,” he said. “I think a student would ask different questions, would ask important questions.”Kirk said the University is seeking student input on possible du Lac revisions.“We look forward to hearing from students,” he said. “All the input will be considered — whether or not it will find its way into the revision of du Lac will depend entirely upon its consistency with the University’s mission to contribute to the moral, intellectual, spiritual and social growth of the students and groups that make up our University community.”last_img read more

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Vermonter to testify before House Committee on Energy and Commerce

first_imgAt the invitation of Rep. Peter Welch, Regulatory Assistance Project Director Richard Cowart will testify Thursday before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce.The East Calais resident will be taking part in the first week of hearings on the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009, a major climate change bill which includes legislation authored by Welch aiming to increase energy efficiency by 20 percent.Cowart, a former commissioner and chairman of the Vermont Public Service Board, will emphasize the critical role energy efficiency can play in addressing climate change while contributing to cost containment for consumers. The world needs us to get control of our greenhouse emissions, but people are worried about the costs of climate legislation. I m delivering good news: we can design a carbon cap-and-trade program to support and reward energy efficiency, which is the low cost carbon scrubber we need today, Cowart said.Welch s Retrofit for Energy and Environmental Performance (REEP) Program would provide resources to homeowners and small business owners to retrofit millions of existing buildings an effort that would create jobs, save money on energy costs and contribute to combating climate change. Welch introduced the REEP Act in March; the legislation was subsequently incorporated into the American Clean Energy and Security Act. Vermont s leadership in achieving savings through energy efficiency will be a resource for the country as it begins to take on significant climate change legislation, Welch said. I am pleased Richard Cowart will bring his knowledge and expertise to this important debate.Source: Congressman Welchlast_img read more

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Queenohearts ready to return reports Stuart Edmunds | Racing News

first_imgHe added: “We are looking at these races around three miles, because I think that is the sort of trip you will see the best of her at.“She is a tough mare that has a touch of quality.”Edmunds also hopes Classic Ben can go one better than on his comeback at Exeter when returning to Sandown, the scene of his only success over fences, for the Betfair London National on December 5.He said: “It was a good prep he had at Exeter. He got outpaced, but stayed on and did everything we wanted him to.“He has come out of the race well, and the plan is to go for the London National.“Everything seems to suit him at Sandown, and he seems to love the place for some reason.”Edmunds expected Classic Ben to need his latest outing, and the manner of his performance took him by surprise.He added: “I thought the track at Exeter would suit it him, but the run was better than I expected.“I just thought the ground might have been a bit quick for him.“He did find it a little bit lively down the back straight, before staying on really well.” Stuart Edmunds reports Grade Two winner Queenohearts remains on course to make her return from injury this month.The seven-year-old has not been sighted since finishing down the field in the Dawn Run Mares’ Novices at the 2019 Cheltenham Festival, having missed all last season.- Advertisement – An outing in either a Pertemps Hurdle qualifier at Market Rasen on November 19, or a Listed mares’ hurdle at Kempton four days later, will be first up for the daughter of Flemensfirth.Edmunds said: “Queenohearts missed last season with a leg injury, but that’s 100 per cent now.“She was going to run this week, but she had some physio and she was just a bit sore – she will be out in the next two weeks.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – “She will either go to Market Rasen for a Pertemps qualifier or the Listed mares’ race at Kempton.“She would have a penalty to carry at Kempton – and whether the ground would be soft enough, I’m not sure.”Queenohearts is yet to race beyond two and a half miles, but Edmunds believes she will improve for a step up in trip.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Postal Service Takes ‘Operation Santa’ Letter Campaign National

first_imgFor more than a century, it was a simple way of making a child’s dreams come true during Christmas. Volunteers could go to the post office, sift through piles of letters that children had sent to Santa Claus and pick one — or more — that tugged at their heartstrings. Gifts were then acquired, wrapped and shipped to families whose space beneath the tree might otherwise be bare.With the coronavirus pandemic still raging, however, the U.S. Postal Service announced on Monday that it was taking its annual “Operation Santa” campaign nationwide, and that letters to Santa could be read exclusively online.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – “Covid-19 has caused undue hardships, both financial and emotional, to so many Americans this year,” Kimberly Frum, a spokeswoman for the Postal Service, said in an email. “The program provides kids and families with an opportunity to receive gifts during the holidays from anonymous, generous postal customers.”- Advertisement – Those customers used to review the letters in person, but Operation Santa has moved largely online in recent years after a pilot program in 2017. By 2019, the online operation had expanded to 15 cities, including New York, Chicago, Denver and Grand Rapids, Mich., to, “enhance the ability for generous people across the nation to help those in need no matter where they live,” Ms. Frum said. So-called legacy programs still operated in New York and Chicago, where customers could go to a post office to read letters in person, but those programs will not be offered this year because of the pandemic, Ms. Frum said.The move to make the program available nationally is an acknowledgment of the grim reality many Americans face going into the holiday season. Widespread job losses have contributed to a situation in which one in eight families don’t have enough to eat. Though jobs have started to return, with last month’s jobs report showing a full percentage point drop in the unemployment rate, the number of long-term unemployed people — those out of work for more than half a year — rose by 50 percent to 3.6 million. And a steep increase in coronavirus cases in recent weeks threatens those fragile economic gains.The Postal Service said the Operation Santa program had received hundreds of thousands of letters each year. “It seems like a small thing,” Ms. Frum said. “But for anyone who is struggling, it’s a huge deal to be able to give or receive a gift and share in a bit of the joy that is the holiday season.” Some things aren’t changing: Much as it had over the past 108 years, the Postal Service said that it was inviting American children to write letters and to mail them to the North Pole, using a special address and ZIP code and affixing the proper postage.This year, however, the letters will be uploaded to the Operation Santa website, so long as they are legible and make specific requests for items like toys, clothes or games. Starting on Dec. 4, postal customers can then read them and choose to send gifts with their responses, with a signature saying it’s from Santa (or St. Nick, Kris Kringle or any of Santa’s many names). – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Catching the DIRFT

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Police find marijuana field along Papua-PNG border

first_imgKeerom Police discovered on Saturday a 1-hectare marijuana field in Waris district, Keerom regency, Papua, which shares a border with Papua New Guinea.”The field has been cleared of plants and we have arrested the owner,” Papua Police spokesperson Sr. Comr. Ahmad Mustofa Kamal said in a statement on Sunday as quoted by kompas.com.He added that the field owner had been identified as 48-year-old Laurens Swo, a farmer who lives near the marijuana field. Read also: Conservative Aceh proposes cannabis legalizationPolice personnel found 56 cannabis trees measuring 1.5 to 3 meters high. They also seized one machete, one air rifle, a bow and five arrows during Saturday’s operation.”Our personnel have uprooted the marijuana plants. We also questioned the suspect at Keerom Police headquarters,” Kamal said. Police charged Laurens under Law No. 35/2009 on narcotics, which carries a maximum punishment of 20 years’ imprisonment and a fine of Rp 8 billion (US$582,000). (eyc) Topics :last_img read more

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Constitutional Court probes why KPK bill got speedy treatment

first_imgIt took the House, notorious for its poor legislative productivity, just 13 working-days from the time the bill was submitted to the time it was endorsed. The move provoked massive demonstrations in Jakarta, tinged with violence, as protesters said the House was conspiring with the government to kill the KPK. President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo met with a group of activists that month, saying he would not sign the bill into law and that when the bill would automatically become law without his signature after one month, he would consider issuing an executive order to annul it.He never did.Six groups have sent different petitions to the court demanding the law be annulled. They represent former commissioners of the antigraft agency, activists, university lecturers and students. They took different angles, some claiming the legislative process was flawed, others raised problems with the substance of the new law. Topics : The Constitutional Court is questioning why the House of Representatives gave the bill to reform the Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK), which was widely opposed by the public, a reading-speed record in September.The court, which is hearing a petition from seven different groups to revoke the law, asked the House on Monday to provide the recording of the House’s deliberations, the full transcripts and the attendance list of House members.The new law came into effect in October, rendering the commission ineffective without independence and without the tools it once had in fighting graft. The new law created a new layer above the commission, called the supervisory council, with the power to veto.center_img The court, the last hope to save the old KPK, decided to hear all seven petitions at once, looking at the procedure and the substance of the legislation.On Monday, judge Wahiduddin Adams, a member of the six-judge panel, expressed skepticism about how the House could have completed the bill in 13 days.“If lawmakers had worked day and night, it is fine,” he told the hearing attended by representatives of the petitioners and lawyers of the government and the House.The court would also look into how much public consultation the House engaged in while deliberating over the bill, including whether it consulted the commissioners of the antigraft agency.Wahiduddin questioned why President Jokowi did not sign the bill into law, which he saw as an anomaly.  “The President had promised to review the bill. What happened? The government should explain it to the public,” he said.He noted that the last time this happened was in 2003 when then president Megawati Soekarnoputri refused to sign a bill on advocacy. In 2002, Megawati also refused to sign a broadcasting bill.On the substance of the new law, the panel of judges questioned the role of the new supervisory council that it said overlaps with the work of the police and the Attorney General’s Office, which also investigate corruption cases.Agus Hariadi, the lawyer representing the government, said the new law complied with the United Nations Convention against Corruption treaty. Representing the House, Arteria Dahlan denied the petitioners’ claim of a lack of public consultation in deliberating over the bill, pointing out that the discussions went as far back as 2008.Arteria questioned the legal standing of all seven groups of plaintiffs in filing the petitions with the court since their work had no direct relation to the new law.“While we respect every citizen’s right, we should respect the sanctity of the court. Only petitioners who have legal standing and qualified material should be allowed,” he said.A lawyer for one of the petitioners, Saor Siagiana, however, said any citizen had the legal right to oppose the new law “because corruption affects us all”. (mfp)last_img read more

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Unai Emery explains why Denis Suarez still hasn’t started a match for Arsenal

first_imgDenis Suarez is yet to start for Arsenal (Picture: Getty)Unai Emery has hinted that Denis Suarez could finally be ready start for Arsenal against Bournemouth this weekend.Suarez has only made four substitute appearances for Arsenal since completing a January loan move from Barcelona and did not even come off the bench as Emery’s side defeated Southampton on Sunday.There had been talk of Arsenal making Suarez’s move permanent in the summer, but the midfielder’s lack of game-time has cast serious doubt on this happening.However, Emery insists Suarez has now improved enough to start for the Gunners.ADVERTISEMENTMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘I think Suarez is improving with his adaptation every day. Then his quality can give us a lot,’ Emery said ahead of Arsenal’s clash with Bournemouth at the Emirates.AdvertisementAdvertisement‘I think he is not OK today to play 90 minutes because he needs rhythm. But one positive is he can start [against Bournemouth] knowing that, or he can stay on the bench and then help us.’ Metro Sport ReporterTuesday 26 Feb 2019 3:59 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link508Shares Arsenal v Bournemouth: Unai Emery press conferenceTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 8:03FullscreenArsenal v Bournemouth: Unai Emery press conferencehttps://metro.co.uk/video/arsenal-v-bournemouth-unai-emery-press-conference-1871444/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. Suarez could start against Bournemouth (Picture: Getty)Emery had planned to bring Suarez on against Southampton but Stephan Lichtsteiner’s injury prevented him from doing so.‘He is working every day, improving and knowing us,’ Emery continued.‘His adaptation needs time to get confidence, to know his team-mates during training and then playing matches. Unai Emery explains why Denis Suarez still hasn’t started a match for Arsenal Advertisement Advertisement Comment Emery’s men host the Cherries at the Emirates (Picture: Getty)‘For him, all the minutes he gets are important. On Sunday [against Southampton] my idea was to play him for some minutes but after Lichtsteiner’s injury I couldn’t give him those minutes.‘But against Bournemouth is another opportunity.’Asked whether Suarez’s move will be made permanent ahead of the 2019/20 campaign, Emery replied: ‘For me the summer is so far away.’MORE: Beckham, Neville, Giggs and Scholes lead mourners for Man U coach’s funerallast_img read more

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Dutch investors set out expectations for oil and gas sector

first_img“We consider the company’s 2020 AGM as a good moment for Shell to demonstrate this,” said the investors.“This statement saves the entire sector years in discussions about which scopes, scenarios, metrics and methodologies are reasonable”Mark van Baal, Follow This The investors also said they expected all oil and gas companies to report on their targets and progress in line with the recommendations of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures.Mark van Baal, of Follow This, said: “These six Dutch investors again take the lead in supporting oil companies to truly commit to Paris.“This statement saves the entire sector years in discussions about which scopes, scenarios, metrics and methodologies are reasonable.” The statement of expectations can be read here.NGOs set out expectations for investor coalitionNine campaign groups* have joined forces to call for Climate Action 100+, a major investor-led engagement initiative, to divulge more information about its activities.The groups also set out their expectations for how the investors involved should engage with companies, governments, and organisations like themselves, in a letter to the CEOs of the more than 320 investors backing the coalition, and to the organisations co-ordinating the initiative. Requests included that investors “adopt a consistent, outcomes-focused and transparent escalation process” and support climate resolutions filed by smaller shareholders and civil society organisations.The campaign groups also recommended that Climate Action 100+ publish a list of company targets and an annual statement detailing progress against them.The investor coalition had celebrated key achievements in recent months, the campaign groups noted, but “a lack of transparency makes it difficult to judge the impact that Climate Action 100+ is having at other companies”.In December, Shell announced it would set short-term emission reduction targets and link them to executive pay, a move that followed engagement with investors under the Climate Action 100+ banner. Climate Action 100+ has also encouraged developments at Glencore and BP.  Catherine Howarth, chief executive of ShareAction, one of the nine campaign groups, said: “Climate Action 100+ is the investor initiative on climate change many were waiting for.“But success depends on action and real effort by all signatory investors, and so far, not all are stepping up. Tone from the top is critical, which is why we’ve written to the CEOs of signatory investors. It’s right that civil society demands accountability and determined action from Climate Action 100+ investors in every region of the world.”Stephanie Pfeifer, a member of the Climate Action 100+ global steering committee and CEO of the Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change, one of the five co-ordinating organisations, said: “We welcome today’s letter from civil society organisations. It is encouraging to see recognition and acknowledgement of all that Climate Action 100+ has achieved so far. The initiative and its investors are committed to results and [are] already delivering on its goals.“We value the input and look forward to dialogue with these organisations, many of whom we already work with closely, on a shared commitment to greater action on climate change.”Preventable Surprises, one of the nine civil society organisations behind the letter, had already issued a challenge to Climate Action 100+ investors upon its launch in 2017.*Australasian Centre for Corporate Responsibility, ClientEarth, Follow This, Greenpeace International, Just Share, Preventable Surprises, Rainforest Action Network, Sierra Club, ShareAction All oil and gas companies should demonstrate credible strategies to achieve greenhouse gas emissions targets in line with keeping global warming to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels, a group of six major Dutch investors has said.The group – comprising Achmea, Actiam, Aegon, Kempen Capital Management, MN, and NN Investment Partners – set out its expectations for the entire oil and gas sector in the wake of campaign group Follow This withdrawing its climate resolution from the agenda for Royal Dutch Shell’s annual general meeting.The campaign group did so following “intensive” discussions with the six Dutch investors, who considered Shell to be an industry leader for the steps it has taken towards aligning with the Paris Agreement climate change goals.The Dutch investors said they encouraged Shell to bring its long-term net carbon footprint ambition in line with the lower 2°C pathway from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the UN body for assessing the science related to climate change.last_img read more

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Petrobras Hires Two MR Tankers from Stena Bulk

first_imgBrazil’s state-owned oil company Petrobras has signed a contract with Stena Bulk for the chartering of its MR product tankers Stena Conqueror and Stena Conquest.The contract is for a term of two years and includes the option to extend the charters for another 11 months. The vessels will carry refined products along the Brazilian coast.“We have a long-standing, highly-valued relationship with Petrobras when it comes to both Suezmax and MR tankers and we are committed to continue to provide them with safe and efficient deliveries. We also hope to expand our relationship in the future,” says Erik Hånell, CEO and President of Stena Bulk.The charters are being announced on the back of the company’s fleet expansion with six Suezmax tankers over the past six months.The ships have been chartered in despite rather difficult market conditions in the sector and Stena Bulk believes that more tonnage will be hired soon.last_img read more