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Dragons return to judge Monster Pitch

Jim Treliving and Bruce Croxon, both well-known personalities from CBC’s popular show Dragons’ Den, are slated to spend some quality time with Brock University students in March.Treliving, one of five Dragons’ Den judges, and Croxon, a former Dragon and co-host of BNN’s The Disruptors, will judge the sixth annual Monster Pitch competition hosted by the Brock Innovation Group in partnership with the Goodman School of Business and sponsored by Spara Capital Partners.Joining Treliving and Croxon are Goodman alumni Deborah Rosati, corporate director and co-founder of Women Get On Board, and Jason Sparaga, co-founder and co-CEO of Spark Power Corp. and founder of Spara Capital Partners. Spara Capital Partners is one of Canada’s leading independent mergers and acquisitions and corporate finance firms working on behalf of private business owners. Spark Power Corp., is a leader and innovator, providing reliable energy services nationally, to a diverse, blue chip customer base in the power and utility sector.Monster Pitch puts entrepreneurial students in the hot seat where they will pitch their ideas to a panel of business experts for a chance to win cash and startup services.No one knows the value of this event better than BBA student Johnathan Holland. Two years ago at Monster Pitch, Holland pitched his idea to build an online marketplace for non-traditional methods of currency exchange.After claiming the grand prize, Holland went on to further develop his venture during two co-op work terms thanks to the Deborah E. Rosati Co-op Entrepreneurship Scholarship. The prize package and networking opportunity that Monster Pitch afforded him were instrumental in getting his company, Curexe, off the ground.“Our team is thrilled to welcome all four judges back,” says BBA student Karlo Visaticki, President of Goodman’s Brock Innovation Group. “They have all been involved with Monster Pitch before and their continued support of entrepreneurship at Brock is extremely valuable to students.”The Brock Innovation Group has now opened applications for Monster Pitch hopefuls on its website. Students who are successful in this round of applications will participate in Monster Pitch on March 22, 2016. read more

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Students explore career opportunities in wine and cider industry

It looked a lot like speed dating: strangers exchanging introductions and asking questions before a buzzer sounds to mark a switch in conversation partners.But instead of looking for their perfect match, Brock Oenology and Viticulture (OEVI) students were using the 15-minute windows to meet and impress potential employers.Hosted at Pond Inlet by Brock’s Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture Institute (CCOVI) and Co-op, Career and Experiential Education, the Jan. 15 event brought students together with a dozen industry professionals to explore careers in the wine industry, including the booming field of cider production.The evening’s setup offered the chance to ask questions about employment opportunities without the pressure and nerves that sometimes come with a job interview. The list of prospective employers included a research development specialist, a vineyard manager, an oenologist and several winemakers, as well as three representatives from the craft cider sector.A little more than five years ago, there were only a handful of cider producers in Ontario, but today, that number sits at more than 60. “The industry is definitely exploding,” said Antonella Presta, a winemaker and cider maker at Sunnybrook Farm Estate Winery and Ironwood Hard Cider, who came out to meet CCOVI’s latest cohort of talented students. “There are so many different styles and opportunities to make great unique products, not only apple cider but also perry (pear cider) and other fruit ciders. They can be hopped or oaked — the possibilities really are endless.”That innovation has cider makers creating a range of products that appeal to a large and growing consumer base, which  has led to a booming industry. With growing demand for cider comes the need for more qualified workers, making the CCOVI career event a solid recruitment opportunity for producers.Colio Estates Wines, in Harrow, Ont., has “changed greatly” since the purchase of Thornbury Cider three years ago and the introduction of Colio’s Cider House, said Chief Financial Officer Derek Cartlidge.The business is currently undergoing a 6,000-square-foot addition and operations have doubled in size over the last several years and continue to grow. That sizeable growth was a big factor in bringing Cartlidge and Colio Estate winemaker Alison Christ to the Brock career night.“It is a great opportunity to get face-to-face with some of these students who may not necessarily think of coming to Lake Erie North Shore, where we are located,” Cartlidge said. “We need help during harvest and we have co-op placements to fill. We are looking for people who are interested in learning and getting a hands-on approach.”Colio and Sunnybrook Farm are just two of the many Ontario wineries now also producing cider.CCOVI is helping apple growers and hard cider producers meet the demands of this rapidly growing market.The Brock institute is the only program provider in Canada to offer a certification in cider production through the Cider Institute of North America (CINA), and also provides analytical testing services to help cider makers deliver the best product possible.“With the strength of the OEVI program and CCOVI’s central role in professional development, our students and alumni are in a great position to be leaders in the growing Canadian cider industry,” said Steven Trussler, the CINA-certified instructor in CCOVI’s cider program. “Seeing these cider-based employers coming to campus to meet our students is great proof of that.”CCOVI is in a position to further drive the industry forward with more advanced courses, including a new professional development program for cider makers that will be unveiled next month at CiderCon — an annual opportunity for the cider community to share ideas, collaborate and learn.“Any time you can get a group of people with experience and knowledge to educate more people about cider, it improves the quality of the entire industry and is great for Ontario,” Christ said. read more

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Modular Mining Systems announces new CEO

first_imgLuiz Steinberg is Modular Mining Systems’ new President and Chief Executive Officer. He will assume the position, currently held by Peter Carter, effective on September 16. Steinberg joined Modular in 1993, and he hassince held a variety of positions of increasing responsibility. In 2000, Steinberg opened the Modular subsidiary in Brazil and served as regional General Manager until 2005. Most recently, as Vice President of Product Development, Steinberg guided hardware and software development and strategic R&D to meet the needs of Modular customers.  “Luiz brings a rich background in high technology, as well as a strong understanding of mining customers,” states Kazunori Kuromoto – President, ICT Business, Construction & Mining Equipment Marketing Division, Komatsu Ltd. Kuromoto continues, “His leadership will enable Modular to continue providing unique and innovative value to the mining industry and to Komatsu mining products and services.”Steinberg holds a B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering from the Federal University of Pernambuco in Brazil and a Master’s degree in Industrial and Systems Engineering and Manufacturing from the University of Florida.Departing President and CEO, Peter Carter, plans to return to his home country of Australia to be closer to his family. Serving as CEO since 2005, Carter has led Modular through unprecedented growth. Regarding his successor, Carter states, “Luiz is well-qualified to lead the company through the next growth stage. He will provide a unique combination of technology and general management knowledge, acquired through his varied assignments at Modular.”Modular provides powerful information management solutions to meet the needs of both surface and underground mining operations worldwide.last_img read more

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Petar Nenadic before EHF CL comeback Ready for any role which Ljubo

The highest-paid transfer during the winter break in Men’s handball, Petar Nenadic move from Fuchse Berlin to Telekom Veszprem, caused a lot of attention in the last few months. The 32-years old Serbian playmaker netted the first goal in win over Gyongyos 31:18 in domestic league, but the real come-back will be seen tonight in Kiel, when Veszprem face one of the biggest rivals (19.30) in the first EHF Champions League match of the year.I am more than satisfied, the first impression is fantastic. Seven days past quickly in moving, first training sessions, finding connections. I had 5-6 sessions with the team, not too much, but I am trying to adapt as quickly as I can. I expect to play against Kiel, but without pressure. I will try to help my team-mates to win two points on tough away match. I will play on playmaker position, but also left back, everything, where I can help. Everything that Ljubo demands, I will try to fulfill – said Nenadic for Balkan-Handball.com. PHOTO: Telekom Veszprem ← Previous Story “GOLDEN IS BACK”: Gudmundur Gudmundsson overtakes Iceland Next Story → Sporting beat Porto in Portuguese derby Petar NenadicTelekom VeszpremTHW Kiel read more

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Greeks in Perth bracing up for Glendi

first_img Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagram Organizers of the ‘Glendi’ Festival in Perth have a very specific goal in mind: to break the record of the ‘World’s Largest LiveLighter Zorba Dance’, set at the 2016 edition, when 2,000 people engaged in joyous sirtaki. “We are hoping to break that record, on Sunday 22 April at Elizabeth Quay and maybe set a world record,” they say.Perth’s ‘Glendi’ Greek Festival returns to Elizabeth Quay on the weekend of 21 and 22 April, with a promise to offer unforgettable moments of energy and vitality to people of all ages. During the weekend, visitors will have the opportunity to taste signature Greek dishes, like souvlaki, gyros, calamari and octopus, while famous pastry chef George Diakomichalis, will create some gastronomic surprises.Pastry chef George Diakomichalis (left), has gastronomic surprises up his sleeve.At the same time, festival goers will enjoy greek folk music and traditional dances from various parts of Greece, as well as oriental dancers and a demonstration of plate-smashing.The festival also includes fun and leisure activities for children, stalls showcasing Greek produce and a bar offering a vast variety of drinks and coffee.Perth’s Glendi Greek Festival, taking place under the auspices of LiveLighter, a Western Australia program to Australian adults to lead healthier lifestyles, is a cultural platform welcoming and uniting Greeks in Perth.“The popularity of the two previous editions of the festival reflects Western Australia’s interest in Greek cultur and I’m certain that the upcoming Glendi will surprise and, once again, unite and delight the broader community that wants to celebrate Greek lifestyle,” says Festival organizer Despene Kalaf. Brought up with the ideals of Greek culture instilled in her by her parents and grandmother, Despene Kalaf developed a strong sense of appreciation from very early age. “I believe that it is very important for my generation to embrace the Greek traditions that our forebearers  taught us and ensure that these customs will continue in the future”, she says.The Glendi Festival will take place on Saturday 21 April (3-10pm) and on Sunday 22 April (11am-8pm).Entry fee is $2 per person – free for children under 12 years old.Perth Glendi Association is a not-for-profit organisation.last_img read more

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Google fête lanniversaire de Thomas Edison

first_imgGoogle fête l’anniversaire de Thomas EdisonLe moteur de recherche a mis à l’honneur le célèbre inventeur américain à l’occasion de son 164eanniversaire.Ce vendredi, Thomas Edison aurait eu 164 ans. Pour célébrer son anniversaire et honorer sa mémoire, Google a modifié son logo sur sa page d’accueil pour le remplacer par un Doodle. Rendant hommage à l’inventeur américain, il renvoie en un clic à une page de résultats sur ce dernier, et donne l’occasion de découvrir sa vie.À lire aussiÉquinoxe du Printemps : pourquoi tombe-t-il le 20 mars ?Né en 1847, Thomas Edison est le fondateur de General Electric, et est principalement connu pour avoir déposé 1093 brevets dont certains ont changé les modes de vie. Pionnier de l’électricité, il s’est notamment autoproclamé inventeur du téléphone, de l’enregistrement du son, et du cinéma. Passionné par la chimie depuis le plus jeune âge, il a pourtant eu des débuts difficiles, vendant des cigares, des journaux, et des bonbons dans le train de la “Grand Trunk Railway”, qui reliait Port Huron à Détroit. Plus tard, il est devenu télégraphiste à Memphis, puis assistant-télégraphiste à la Western Union Company de Toronto, au Canada. Parfois surnommé le magicien de Menlo Park, ville rebaptisée en son honneur en 1954, Thomas Edison est décédé le 18 octobre 1931, à l’âge de 83 ans.Le 11 février 2011 à 18:29 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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Moo place vos profils sur cartes de visite

first_imgMoo place vos profils sur cartes de visiteDes cartes de visite façon Facebook? C’est désormais possible. Moo, un service d’impression de cartes d’affaires en ligne, s’est associé au réseau social pour proposer des cartes inspirées des profils. Ce service, accessible depuis Facebook et sur Moo, n’est cependant disponible que pour les utilisateurs qui sont passé sur Facebook Timeline. Le recto de la carte présentera la page de couverture d’un album, la photo de profil et les informations et coordonnées affichées. Sur le verso, la carte affichera une citation ainsi que l’URL du compte Facebook, le numéro de téléphone et l’adresse mail. Chacun peut éditer ses carte, cela devrait donc permettre aux quelques 800 millions d’utilisateurs de créer leurs cartes de visite personnalisées. Et pour les plus chanceux, les 200.000 premiers clients recevront gratuitement 50 cartes d’affaires, gracieusement offertes par Moo. Ensuite, pour une cinquantaine de cartes, l’usager devra débourser 15$ (12€). Mais grâce à l’option “Printfinity”, le prix restera identique, même si l’utilisateur souhaite utiliser une photo différente de l’album pour chaque photo. Pour pouvoir bénéficier de ce service via Facebook, rien de plus simple. L’usager n’a qu’à cliquer sur la carte placée à droite de ses coordonnées sur sa page d’informations personnelles. Le 9 janvier 2012 à 15:45 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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Firefighters reach 100 containment on 265acre Recycle Fire in Campo

first_img Posted: June 8, 2018 KUSI Newsroom June 8, 2018 Updated: 9:05 PM Firefighters reach 100% containment on 265-acre ‘Recycle Fire’ in Campo KUSI Newsroom, #RecycleFire [final] IC reports the fire to be 100% contained. Crews will continue with suppression repair efforts through the weekend. For tips on how to prepare for wildfire please visit https://t.co/RtiMTEMqOK and https://t.co/qfAfagcmLE pic.twitter.com/Pp56bwsNNm— CAL FIRE SAN DIEGO (@CALFIRESANDIEGO) June 9, 2018One firefighter sustained a minor injury Wednesday in the first few hours of the battle to corral the blaze, which had grown to 265 acres as of mid-afternoon Wednesday, Cal Fire Capt. Issac Sanchez said. The so-called “Recycle Fire” was still holding at that size Friday morning.About 90 minutes after it was first reported, the flames had blackened roughly 25 acres as crews worked to stop them from the ground and aboard air tankers and water-dropping helicopters, Sanchez said. As the blaze grew to over 250 acres, authorities issued evacuation warnings to residents along North Campo Truck Trail, and later, to people who living on La Posta Road. But thosewarnings were lifted just a few hours later.As of 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, crews had the spread of the fire halted and its perimeter about 5 percent contained. It was at 15 percent containment Wednesday night, 30 percent Thursday morning and 65 percent Thursday evening.Crews will continue with suppression repair efforts through the weekend.The cause of the blaze — dubbed the Recycle Fire due to its proximity to a rural byway known to locals as “Recycle Road” — was not immediately clear, Sanchez said. CAMPO (KUSI) — A wildfire that blackened hundreds of open acres in the far southeastern reaches of San Diego County was 100 percent contained Friday afternoon, fire officials said.The back-country blaze erupted for unknown reasons about 9:45 a.m. Wednesday off the 31000 block of state Route 94 in the Cameron Corners area of Campo, according to Cal Fire San Diego officials. It sent a thick column of brown-and-white smoke into the air near the U.S.-Mexico border and prompted two evacuation warnings that were later rescinded. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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2A boys basketball Hockinson boys come up short vs Lynden

first_imgYAKIMA — Lynden’s tall firs left Hockinson stumped.One of the tallest teams in the Class 2A state tournament showed why it’s a favorite to win it all. Lynden’s height overshadowed Hockinson’s shooters in a 50-43 win Thursday in the quarterfinals at the Sundome.Hockinson (19-6) will play a consolation-round game at 2 p.m. Friday against top-ranked Clarkston (21-4), which was upset in its quarterfinal game by unranked Lake Washington.With four starters 6-foot-3 or taller, Lynden sought to exploit its height advantage over a Hockinson lineup that had four players 6-foot-1 or shorter.That height discrepancy showed itself mostly in Lynden’s defense. Every Hockinson drive to the rim was aggressively contested. Lynden’s perimeter defenders stayed in the face of Hockinson’s outside shooters, preventing any open looks.Hockinson finished the game 15-for-54 from the field (27.8 percent).“Their half-court defense was phenomenal,” Hockinson coach Trevor Person said. “We had to scrap for everything we got. We didn’t finish well around the rim, but give them credit. They were big, physical and challenged our shots.”last_img read more

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A rare look at the meltdown inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

first_img Sci-Tech 2 James Martin/CNET The meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011 was the worst nuclear disaster in history. It’s also a place where technology plays a unique — and critical — role in the cleanup efforts. Fixing FukushimaFixing Fukushima is a multipart series that explores the role technology plays in cleaning up the worst nuclear disaster in history.This problem is so massive that it will likely take several decades and tens of billions of dollars to fix. Next Monday marks the eighth anniversary of the earthquake and tsunami that triggered the disaster. Ahead of that milestone, CNET paid a visit to Fukushima to look at the different kinds of technology being employed at the facility, whether it’s robots going into the reactors themselves, or drones and virtual reality offering views of the facility. The following is a collection of key moments from our journey. As we pass through what remains of an abandoned village, my Geiger counter begins to register the remnants of the nuclear disaster. We’re approaching Fukushima Daiichi, where a guard stands near the entrance.Inside Japan's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant James Martin/CNET The facility is surprisingly colorful and busy. Thousands of workers are here as part of a cleanup that will likely take the rest of their lives, if not longer. Fukushima Daiichi, the decommissioned power plant, is like no place I’ve ever been.Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant clean-up James Martin/CNET Each day, thousands of workers struggle to clean up the disabled 860-acre site. Shutting it down completely is expected to take decades. It will require the development of new processes and specialized technologies. The effort will take so long that Tepco, Fukushima’s owner, and the government are now grooming a next generation of robotics experts to finish the job. “It’s of the magnitude of putting a man on the moon,” says Lake Barrett, a senior advisor to Tepco, who previously served as acting director of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management at the US Department of Energy. “Unless there’s an acceleration, I would not be surprised if it takes 60 years or so.”Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant clean-up James Martin/CNET Following the initial quake, two 50-foot-high waves barreled straight at Fukushima Daiichi, washing over coastal seawalls and disabling the diesel generators that powered the plant’s seawater cooling systems. Temperatures inside the reactors skyrocketed to 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit (2,760 Celsius). Fuel rods became molten puddles of uranium that chewed through the floors below. They left a radioactive heap of concrete, steel and melted debris. Molten fuel ultimately sank into the three reactors’ primary containment vessels, which are designed to catch and secure contaminated material.Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant clean-up James Martin/CNET Using remote cameras and robotics, technicians are able to explore the interior of Unit 2 from a central control room 350 meters away. Much of the work being done is exploratory, giving technicians a sense of the conditions inside.The nearly two dozen men in the room work with quiet intensity. All wear jumpsuits color-coded to their company affiliations.Two special chairs have been outfitted with joysticks at the end of each armrest. From one of the chairs, a Tepco operator controls a specially built Brokk 400D, a big blue bot that looks like a miniature excavator on two large treads. The operator stares intently at four monitors, which give him a real-time feed of what’s happening inside the Unit 2 reactor.Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant clean-up James Martin/CNET Outdoors on the ground between Units 2 and 3, the environment is radioactive, with readings as high as 332 microSieverts per hour of exposure. A dose of 1 Sievert is enough to cause radiation sickness, with effects such as nausea, vomiting and hemorrhaging. One dose of 5 Sieverts an hour would kill about half of those exposed to it within a month, while exposure to 10 Sieverts in an hour would be fatal within weeks.Inside the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant James Martin/CNET Tepco workers crouch inside the claustrophobic control rod array of Unit 5 reactor’s primary containment vessel, the cylindrical structure that contains the reactor. The Unit 5 reactor wasn’t operating when the tsunami hit in 2011, sparing it from the catastrophic meltdowns in other units. That’s why we were able to visit and see its architecture and systems. It’s identical to other reactors on site.Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant clean-up James Martin/CNET The 860-acre seaside site of the Fukushima Daiichi facility was once rolling green hills, but following the disaster in 2011, almost every surface was paved over in concrete to prevent the spread of contaminated soil. In what looks like the landscape of a barren industrial apocalypse, signs of the natural world do still exist, as weeds grown up through the concrete, through cracks and along the roads.Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station clean-up James Martin/CNET Slowly, engineers are figuring out how to develop new robotics specially designed to venture inside the reactors where humans can’t go because of radiation levels that deliver a lethal dose within minutes. The extreme environment even crippled most of the early robots used in operations at Fukushima Daiichi. High gamma radiation levels scrambled the electrons within the semiconductors of the robots’ brains, interfering with and destroying electronics and damaging circuits. That meant the cleanup can’t use machines that are too sophisticated.  Overly complex autonomous robots would either shut down under the extreme conditions or get snared in the wreckage of the damaged systems.Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station clean-up James Martin/CNET This is CNET News Executive Editor Roger Cheng inside the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station during our November 2018 visit to the facility.Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station clean-up James Martin/CNET A bus moved us through the maze-like industrial landscape of Fukushima Daiichi. Dismal, complex and grey, the facility felt like another world, the kind that you’d think exists only in video games.Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station clean-up James Martin/CNET The view from the top of Unit 3 at Fukushima Daiichi is unexpectedly picturesque, with the Pacific Ocean on the horizon.Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station clean-up James Martin/CNET Radiation in Unit 1 has been measured at 4.1 to 9.7 Sieverts per hour. And two years ago, a reading taken at the deepest level of Unit 2 was an “unimaginable” 530 Sieverts, according to The Guardian. Readings elsewhere in Unit 2 are typically closer to 70 Sieverts an hour, still making it the hottest of Daiichi’s hotspots.  Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station clean-up James Martin/CNET Thin steel cables suspend a chrome robot in the center of the frame. The robot, largely obscured by a pink plastic wrapper, is equipped with so-called manipulators that can cut rubble and grab fuel rods. Once cleanup begins, this robot will eventually pull the radioactive wreckage out of a 39-foot-deep pool in the center of the room.Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station clean-up James Martin/CNET Here, we see the spent-fuel pool on top of Unit 3. Beneath it lie remnants of fuel rods and the melted remains of the functional reactor. The radiation level in the Unit 3 Primary Containment Vessel below is estimated at 1 Sievert per hour, or 2,000 times the level at the railing overlooking the pool, which is already so high we are only allowed to stand there for just a few minutes. Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station clean-up James Martin/CNET Tepco workers lead us up a freight elevator about five stories to the top of Unit 3 reactor. Our dosimeters make a high-pitched screech as we stand at the railing overlooking the spent-fuel pool, warning us of the extreme exposure and to back away. Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station clean-up James Martin/CNET In order to cool the reactors, water is constantly added. But it quickly leaks from the damaged infrastructure. The contaminated water must then be handled here in the water treatment facility, where technology has enabled Tepco to remove 62 of the 63 radioactive elements from the water. One element, tritium, can’t be removed.Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station James Martin/CNET A worker walks by a large-tracked heavy equipment mover at the port at the Fukushima Daiichi. Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant James Martin/CNET Fukushima Daiichi, though a decommissioned nuclear facility, is bustling with activity as masked workers wearing respirators, jumpsuits and yellow boots hurry back and forth. Inside Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station James Martin/CNET Researchers test an underwater robots at the nearby Naraha Center for Remote Control Technology, a facility set up by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency for companies, students and other researchers to try out machines designed for work at the nuclear facility. Inside the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant James Martin/CNET Other testing facilities include stairs that can be moved and adjusted to re-create a range of challenges that robots, which tend to struggle with basic tasks, will likely encounter as the cleanup process moves forward.Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station James Martin/CNET As we pass through the first of what remains of the abandoned villages, a guard stands near the entrance to the decommissioned Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. My Geiger counter registers the invisible remnants of the nuclear accident. Abandoned clothing store in Fukushima prefecture, Japan James Martin/CNET Eight years following the evacuation, purses and shoes sit on the racks in an abandoned clothing store in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Though this area — officially designated “difficult-to-return” — in the village of Futaba has been reopened, it’s primarily used for transit. In the eight years since the accident here, families have relocated and re-established their lives elsewhere.fukushima-daiichi-final-8810 James Martin/CNET Restaurants, grocery stores and a uniquely Japanese Sonic the Hedgehog video game hall sit crumbling, abandoned. Radiation monitoring stations line the streets, and though cars are permitted on the main road here, side roads are often blocked with “No Entry!” gates and signs and politely urging motorists to “Please pass through as quickly as possible.” Massive sea walls are being built along the coast in Fukushima Prefecture in Japan James Martin/CNET Massive 41-foot-tall concrete seawalls have been built along many parts of the coast in Fukushima Prefecture to protect against future tsunamis. The recovery will take time, patience and a lot of ingenuity. Tags Share your voice Comments Robotslast_img read more