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Drummer Steve Adler Reunites With Guns N’ Roses For The First Time Since 1990

first_imgNow a few shows into their Not In This Lifetime tour, it’s safe to say that Guns N’ Roses are back. With Slash and Axl Rose somehow not hating each other, the tour has already made a few stops, and continues to pick up steam throughout the summer. Last night’s performance featured another classic GNR member as well, as drummer Steven Adler stopped in to pick up the sticks for two great Appetite For Destruction classics, “Out Ta Get Me” and “My Michelle.”While Adler opted out for the major Guns N’ Roses reunion due to health problems, his return to the stage seemingly signaled that the band is as comfortable playing together as ever. Though the drummer was kicked out of the band in 1990 due to his drug addiction, he sounded great while playing with them last night. Seeing four-fifths of the original Appetite For Destruction-era GNR lineup on stage (Izzy Stradlin remains the final holdout) must have been quite the treat, allowing fans to relive the anthemic rock music with passionate nostalgia.You can watch Adler in action on both songs, below.Check out the full setlist from the Paul Brown Stadium in Cincinnati, OH. Edit this setlist | More Guns N’ Roses setlistslast_img read more

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Ween Announces 2 New West Coast Dates

first_imgA few weeks ago, Ween added to their summer touring schedule, announcing a number of new shows in late July in Ohio and the Northeast. Today, the band has added to its upcoming tour dates, announcing a pair of shows at Edgefield Concerts in Troutdale, Oregon, a venue located just east of Portland. The group will head to the West Coast for the two-night run in August, with the shows on August 17th and 18th marketed as “An Evening With Ween.”The band, which consists of Gene and Dean Ween alongside longtime band members Claude Coleman, Jr. (drums), Dave Dreiwitz (bass) and Glenn McClelland (keyboards), had previously announced a June run through Missouri and Colorado’s Red Rocks Amphitheatre.As the band continues to add tour dates sporadically, here’s to hoping that these dates hint at the coming announcement of a full-fledged West Coast tour in the late summer. Tickets for Ween’s upcoming August 17th and August 18th performance at Edgefield go on sale on Friday, April 20th, at 10 a.m. (PT) via Ticketfly.last_img read more

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Improving the classroom experience

first_imgStudents in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) can look forward to less shuffling between classrooms, more books on the shelf at the Coop, and a better experience in section next spring, thanks to a new pre-term planning (PTP) initiative that will be implemented this October.“Pre-term planning will allow us to use resources more effectively to improve students’ overall educational experience,” says Noël Bisson, associate dean of Undergraduate Education. “Best of all, the system allows us to preserve the traditional exploration of classes at the start of a new semester.”In late October, students will be asked to identify courses they are thinking of taking in the spring using a new online PTP tool on the Office of the Registrar’s website. College seniors and first- and second-year students at the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (GSAS) will get to participate first. Juniors, sophomores, and freshmen will follow on a staggered schedule. The process will wrap up for the College in mid-November; early December for the GSAS.Bisson and her colleague, Stephanie Kenen, also an associate dean of Undergraduate Education, say that it’s important for students to understand that PTP is not pre-registration. Students are not bound to take the courses they select and are free to explore different classes early in the semester. Registration will proceed as usual, which also means that participation in PTP does not guarantee a place in a limited-enrollment class.Faculty will provide useful information about spring term courses so that students can make informed selections during PTP. Jay Harris, dean of Undergraduate Education, has asked faculty to activate course websites and update with relevant information — including course descriptions, a list of preliminary topics and readings, and a rundown of assignments and requirements — at least a week before the process kicks off.With some sense of student interest, administrators and faculty can make better decisions about resources. They can, for instance, hire teaching fellows in numbers more appropriate to each class. The fellows in turn will know earlier what subjects they will teach, and will have more time to prepare. Bisson says this will lead to better section meetings.“It’s not counterintuitive,” she says. “Graduate students who know what they’re teaching ahead of time will do better as teachers.”Bisson says that PTP will also give the Registrar’s Office a better idea of how many students will enroll in a class, allowing them to place courses in spaces that are neither too big nor too small. As a result, students will be subject to less disruption and scrambling in the first weeks of the semester.“The information will help enormously with classroom assignment,” she says. “The way things are now, we have no idea how many students will be in any given course at the end of the first week. So many can show up to the first couple of classes that we need to move it to a larger room. Then half of them decide not to take the course, so we have to move it someplace smaller. This can happen two or three times, so students and faculty can’t really settle down until the second or third week.”Bisson also says that PTP data will lead to more accurate ordering of course materials, reducing the chances of a Harvard student’s least favorite sight: an empty shelf in the Coop’s textbook department.“When course materials sell out, students put their energy into tracking down books instead of class work,” she says. “That leads to a poorer educational experience.”Even though PTP selections are not binding, they will still give faculty and administrators the information they need to make improvements. That’s because PTP numbers should accurately track enrollment for many courses, even when students who initially express interest in a course do not end up taking it.“Pre-term planning undertaken at peer institutions has shown that what matters is the overall number of students interested in a particular course, rather than the interest of any particular student in that course,” Bisson explains. “For instance, say 100 students indicate interest in a particular course. When registration time comes around, it’s likely that close to 100 students will end up enrolling — but not the same 100 who had originally selected the class. Someone usually takes the place of the student who decides not to enroll.”Bisson says that PTP will begin paying dividends in a few semesters, when enough data has been collected and analyzed. Until then, there will be bumps along the road.“We don’t expect the PTP numbers and enrollment numbers to match exactly,” Bisson says. “Some courses will correspond more closely. Some will have larger error rates. We’ll understand enrollment patterns a lot better after a few times through the process.”PTP will be back in the summer to allow students to make selections for fall term. Incoming freshmen will not participate, however, so that they can have access to advising resources before picking classes. For now, students can find out more at the PTP website, by emailing ptp@fas.harvard.edu, or by visiting the website of the Office of the Registrar and clicking from Undergraduates to Pre-Term Planning.last_img read more

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Harvard visits inspire Greenwood and Agassiz students

first_img“I’ve never seen a museum inside of a University,” said 10-year old Sabrina Ortiz from Boston Public School’s Elihu Greenwood Leadership Academy standing inside the Harvard Museum of Natural History, “Its amazing and inspiring me to learn.”She summed up the goal of the Harvard visit with those final words.Ortiz was part of a group of 30 students from the Greenwood who visited Harvard University for a multi-faceted campus experience as part of Step UP’s “Science Across the Semester.”  The fourth grade students spent the whole school day on Harvard’s campus April 12.  The mission: to engage in an authentic college campus visit where science learning is highlighted.Like any other Harvard college student, these BPS children enjoyed lunch in Harvard’s historic, wood-paneled Annenberg Hall, They sat on the green outside Annenberg and learned first hand what college life is like from Jorge Pozo, a graduate student at the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, who also encouraged the students to achieve their dreams with his own personal story.They toured the Harvard Museum of Natural History, and later received four free passes to return with their families.  Then when they thought they had seen it all, the students took in the sights of the oldest college campus in the nation under the expert guidance of Harvard college students.“These exposures to college and campus science are a small example of what Harvard is doing through Step UP to support teaching and learning,” said Emily Barr, program coordinator at the Harvard Achievement Support Initiative. “It’s incredibly satisfying for us to watch their eyes light up  — to be part of an initiative that is providing opportunities for new experiences that will motivate these Boston Public School children.”The Greenwood field trip was one of a series of four Harvard Step UP visits on campus this April that gave 140 fourth and fifth graders at the Greenwood and Louis Agassiz Elementary Schools their first in-depth experience incorporating both college life and campus science.  Harvard participates in a range of early college awareness programs that bring a total of about 700 local children onto Harvard’s campus each year.Step UP is a collaboration among local universities and Boston schools that promotes student achievement. Harvard is a founding member of Step UP and has been offering after-school program support, learning materials, and professional development at the schools for the past four years.last_img read more

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Martin ‘Marty’ Baron to speak at Commencement

first_imgMartin “Marty” Baron, widely regarded as one of the leading newspaper editors of his era, will be the principal speaker at the Afternoon Program of Harvard’s 369th Commencement on May 28.“Marty Baron has led some of our nation’s most respected newspapers through a transformative time for American journalism,” said Harvard President Larry Bacow. “His distinguished career bespeaks a deep commitment to the pursuit of truth and to the vital role of a free press in a democratic society. We look forward to welcoming him here on Commencement Day.”Baron is executive editor of The Washington Post, managing its news operations and a staff of more than 850 journalists. During his 44-year career, he has led three of the nation’s most influential newspapers, held top posts in two others, and shepherded his news staffs to 16 Pulitzer Prizes.A strong advocate for the vital role of newspapers in holding powerful institutions accountable, Baron was awarded the 2019 Goldsmith Career Award for Excellence in Journalism by the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School. Accepting that award, Baron highlighted the role of reporters as “activists only in service of finding out the facts, and finding out the truth.”In 2019, he guided The Post in publishing The Afghanistan Papers, a trove of previously undisclosed information and insights regarding the trajectory and execution of America’s longest war. And in 2014, he oversaw groundbreaking reporting that uncovered large-scale surveillance of civilians by the National Security Agency. Since 2013, when Baron began leading the Post’s newsroom, the organization has won nine Pulitzers.Baron was editor of The Boston Globe for 11 years, during which it won six Pulitzers, for public service, explanatory journalism, national reporting, and criticism. Most notably, the Globe won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service in 2003 for its wide-ranging investigation into the Catholic Church’s pattern of concealing sex abuse by clergy. The investigation and its impact were portrayed in the Academy Award-winning movie “Spotlight.”Before joining the Globe, Baron held senior editing positions at The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, and The Miami Herald. Under his leadership as executive editor, the Herald won the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Coverage in 2001 for its reporting on the raid to recover Elián González, the Cuban boy at the center of a fierce immigration and custody dispute. Baron began his journalism career at the Herald in 1976 as a reporter.As principal speaker at the Afternoon Program, Baron will address the annual meeting of the Harvard Alumni Association, held in Harvard Yard’s Tercentenary Theatre between Widener Library and the Memorial Church. He also will be awarded an honorary degree.“For decades, Marty Baron has pursued truth and tirelessly championed the role of journalism in enabling healthy democracy and fact-based discourse and debate on critical issues around the world,” said Alice Hill, president of the  Alumni Association. “A bold and decisive leader in his field, Marty’s distinguished career has been marked by determination, integrity, and a willingness to listen to the powerless and too-often voiceless. He will both inspire and engage our graduating students, Harvard alumni, and our entire community.”Born in 1954, Baron was raised in Tampa, Fla. He graduated from Lehigh University in 1976 with B.A. and M.B.A. degrees. His career awards and honors include National Press Foundation Editor of the Year, 2004; inductee, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 2012; award for public leadership, University of Pennsylvania’s Fels Institute of Government, 2016; Carr Van Anda Award for Excellence in Journalism, E.W. Scripps School of Journalism, 2016; Benton Medal for Distinguished Public Service, University of Chicago, 2018; and First Amendment Award, Ford Hall Forum at Suffolk University, 2019.Past Harvard Commencement speakers have included Civil Rights icon and U.S. Rep. John Lewis; former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright; entrepreneur and talk show host Oprah Winfrey; author J.K. Rowling; and, last year, German Chancellor Angela Merkel.last_img read more

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Dreading water

first_imgBy Dan RahnUniversity of GeorgiaWith the fall harvest set to begin, Georgia muscadine growers arewarily eyeing Tropical Storm Katrina, hoping the tropical seasonwill be kinder to them this year than last.”We had three storms last year, and they cost us about half ofour crop,” said Charles Cowart, owner of Still Pond Vineyardsnear Arlington, Ga. “We don’t need any more of that.”Cowart said he had planned to begin harvesting his 160 acres ofmuscadine grapes this week. “But they’re just not ripening,” hesaid. “We’ve put it off now until the first of next week.”As Katrina began threatening south Florida, the Georgia muscadinecrop was looking good. “We’ve got a better-than-average crop,”Cowart said. “The sugars are low, but we’ve got some prettyfruit, large fruit.”No problemThe low sugar content isn’t a problem, he said. “If everybodyelse had high sugars and we were the only ones around with lowsugars, it might be a problem,” he said. “But in a high-moistureseason, everybody’s got low sugars. That’s just a given.”The rainy summer, he said, will just “make the sugar man happy.”Some sugar has to be added to any muscadine juice being fermentedinto wine. The lower the sugar content, the greater the need foradded sugar.The summer’s abundant rainfall has created a more seriouspotential problem, though: a high risk for tropical storm damage.The crop just can’t handle a lot of rain right now.”It would split a lot of grapes,” Cowart said. “There’s just somuch water they can hold, and they can’t go beyond that. Thegrapes are ripening now, and if we get a lot of rain now they’lltake up more water than they can hold.”Wind damageHigh winds could hurt the crop, too, said Paul Wigley, theUniversity of Georgia Cooperative Extension coordinator inCalhoun County.”High winds can put a bunch of grapes on the ground,” Wigleysaid. “And once the grapes hit the ground, you can’t use them injuices or wines.”Cowart, who makes juice and wine products with all of hismuscadine crop, said Tropical Storm Frances hit his farm with 50to 60 mile-per-hour winds in early September last year and shookoff a lot of his grapes.”The grapes aren’t as ripe now as they were with Frances,” hesaid. The heavier the grapes, the more susceptible they are tobeing blown off their vines by high winds.Georgia has about 1,200 commercial acres of muscadines. The cropbegins ripening in August in south Georgia. The harvest movesnorthward through the upper piedmont area, where it ends in earlyOctober.Many Georgia gardeners grow muscadines as a backyard fruit. UGAExtension experts figure the state has probably twice as manybackyard muscadines as commercial acres. Your county UGAExtension agent can tell you how to grow them.(Dan Rahn is a news editor with the University of GeorgiaCollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Guatemala and U.S. Provide Humanitarian Aid to Communities in Need

first_imgBy Jennyfer Hernandez/Diálogo April 11, 2018 Communities in western Guatemala received health care as part of a U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) development assistance campaign with the support of the Guatemalan government. The humanitarian aid exercise took place February 13-15, 2018. Members of SOUTHCOM’s Joint Task Force Bravo (JTF-Bravo), headquartered at Soto Cano Air Base in Comayagua, Honduras, deployed to the municipality of Nentón, on Guatemala’s border with Mexico. Elements from the 5th Infantry Brigade of the Guatemalan Army joined the 66 doctors and services members from the JTF-Bravo team. JTF-Bravo also received support from the Guatemalan Ministry of Public Health and Social Services, the Ministry of Defense, and the Secretariat of Public Works of the First Lady of Guatemala. The purpose of the exercise was to provide health care to low-income residents in remote areas, while also training service members and health professionals to respond to potential natural disasters in the region. The medical brigade provided free health care services to more than 1,500 people. Vital medical services “Of course, [local residents] were very happy,” Guatemalan Army Colonel Oscar Pérez Figueroa, spokesman for the Guatemalan Ministry of Defense, told Diálogo. “But, most of all, they were very grateful […] because it’s not every day that they get these services.” In addition to basic medical and dental services, residents of Nentón and nearby communities also received classes on preventive medicine and dental hygiene, as well as important information on preventing common illnesses and diseases. Medical specialists offered services in pediatrics, obstetrics, and otorhinolaryngology. The help also included medicine, antibiotics, vitamins, and various supplies, such as canes. “For us, these services are important because local residents have urgent medical issues that can rarely be treated as they should be. There are people who’ve never been to the doctor because these services don’t exist,” Col. Pérez explained. “Extracting a molar, doing vision exams, distributing vitamins and deworming medicine, and even promoting children’s hygiene, such as tooth brushing and getting haircuts, help us change people’s conditions. Without U.S. service members’ help, it would be nearly impossible to achieve this in these communities.” Welcomed aid Each day of the campaign, hundreds of people gathered near Finca La Trinidad public school, which served as a medical center for U.S. and Guatemalan specialists. Children and adults patiently waited for their turn to get the needed care and for doctors to see them. “The people of Nentón began lining up at 6 in the morning in front of the school so that they could get these kinds of treatments,” Col. Pérez said. “There are housewives arriving with their four children to have teeth extracted. And there are even adults who came to have a tooth pulled.” For authorities in the department of Huehuetenango, the assistance was a blessing received with joy. The joint effort, they stressed, builds trust between the locals and service members. “We’re delighted to have these young fellows in our municipality, helping our local people,” Rudy Gordillo, mayor of Nentón, said. “I’m grateful for all the efforts made to improve the health of our community because we need it. To see our people getting this kind of assistance is a most welcome sight for us as local authorities.” Extreme poverty According to the United Nations Development Programme’s 2016 Regional Human Development Report for Latin America and the Caribbean, in Guatemala, three million people live in extreme poverty, lacking basic necessities such as food, potable water, sanitation, and education. The most recent data from Guatemala’s National Institute for Statistics, according to its 2011 Rural Poverty Map, indicated that more than 67 percent of the Huehuetenango population lived in poverty. “Huehuetenango is a vital region to work together on these projects, given the poverty of its people and the scarce medical services available there,” said U.S. Army Major Sergio López, a representative for SOUTHCOM’s Overseas Humanitarian Disaster and Civic Aid (OHDACA) program in Guatemala. “That’s why basic services were brought into this department. I’ve seen lots of cases, and there is a lot of need there,” he told Diálogo. The combined U.S.-Guatemalan exercise has been held every year since 2012. In 2017, people of the southern department of Chiquimula, which borders Honduras and El Salvador, also benefited from the development assistance campaign. Communities are selected according to the scarcity of health care services. “This helps us work together with other entities to improve the environment, making it more trusting and cooperative,” Maj. Lopez concluded. “We focus on humanitarian aid to provide basic health care so that people will have what they need for their well-being.”last_img read more

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December 15, 2004 On the Move

first_img On the Move Lance C. Lucey and Ryan K. Parker joined Zimmerman, Kiser & Sutcliffe, P.A., in Orlando, as associates. Lucey and Parker concentrate in real estate, corporate law, banking and loans, and commercial transactions. Adam T. Rabin was named shareholder of the new West Palm Beach office of Dimond, Kaplan & Rothstein, P.A. Rabin focuses on representing investors in securities arbitration, prosecuting class actions, and representing businesses and individuals in commercial and intellectual property litigation. The office is located at Trump Plaza, 525 S. Flagler Dr., Suite 200, West Palm Beach. Rachel Goldstein joined Michaud, Buschmann, Mittelmark, Millian, Blitz, Warren & Coel in Boca Raton as an associate. Goldstein practices in the transactional and regulatory division and will focus her practice on disciplinary matters, health care compliance and contracts, and other health law matters. Peggy A. Underbrink joined Schwartz, Zweben & Associates in Stuart as an associate. Underbrink concentrates on ADA and personal injury litigation with offices at 205 S.W. Winnachee Dr., Stuart 34994; phone (772) 223-5454. Julie Narhi, Garrett Lewes Pendleton, and Meredith A. Phipps joined Phelps Dunbar, LLP in Tampa as associates. Narhi and Pendleton will practice in the insurance and reinsurance group and Phipps will practice in the commercial litigation group. Allison Page Gallagher joined the Orlando office of Akerman Senterfitt as an associate in the litigation group. Daniel B. Bass Mediations merged with Mediar, Inc., 1848 S.E. 1st Ave., Ft. Lauderdale 33316; phone (954) 467-1276; fax (954) 356-0017; e-mail dbblaw@msn.com. Bass will continue to mediate family and civil cases. Devand A. Sukhdeo joined Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, P.C. in Miami as shareholder. Sukhdeo represents employers in all aspects of labor and employment law. Alvin Davis succeeded Joseph P. Klock, Jr., as managing partner of Hector & Davis, LLP in Miami. Kluger, Peretz, Kaplan & Berlin, P.L. announced its affiliation with The Law Firm Alliance. Frank J. Aloia, Jr., and Ty G. Roland of Aloia & Roland, LLP announced the relocation of their office to 2250 First Street, Ft. Myers 33901; phone (239) 791-7950; fax (239) 791-7951. Matthew T. Ramenda joined Jones, Foster, Johnston & Stubbs, P.A., in West Palm Beach as an associate in the litigation department. Ramenda practices in the areas of general civil litigation and personal injury litigation. Danielle J. Butler joined Hills, Betts & Nash, LLP in Miami. Butler handles both litigation and transactional matters within the pleasure boating community. K. Clayton Bricklemyer and Michael Silver joined Macfarlane, Ferguson & McMullen in Tampa as associates. Bricklemyer concentrates in real estate transactions and related issues. Silver concentrates in business litigation and professional liability litigation. Ted C. Curtis announces the relocation of his office to The Waldo House, 719 Northeast First Street, Gainesville 32602; phone (352) 378-1405; fax (352) 374-4998. Curtis continues to practice in the areas of criminal trial work and personal injury. Paige A. Greenlee joined Hill, Ward & Henderson, P.A. in Tampa as an associate. Greenlee practices in the creditors’ rights and bankruptcy group. Jill Baron was appointed assistant vice president/major accounts sales manager for Florida for Fidelity National Title Insurance Company of New York. Jonathan T. Brand, Laura E. Minton, and Jason C. Halliburton have joined Dean Mead as associates. Brand practices in the Orlando office and concentrates in commercial loan transactions, real estate development, financing, and leasing. Minton practices in the Viera office and concentrates on commercial real estate. Halliburton practices in the Ft. Pierce office and concentrates in the areas of commercial litigation and real estate. Richard Celler joined The Shavitz Law Group, P.A., in Boca Raton and concentrates in the area of labor law including unpaid overtime and unpaid minimum wages. Additionally, the firm has relocated to 7800 Congress Ave., Suite 108, Boca Raton 33487; phone (561) 447-8888, (888) 599-2437; fax (561) 447-8831; Web site www.shavitzlaw.com. Richard W. Bassett announces the formation of the Law Offices of Richard W. Bassett, P.A. in West Palm Beach. The firm concentrates in the areas of personal injury, nursing home neglect, medical malpractice, premise liability, and commercial litigation. Whitney Harrell recently joined Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell P.A. in Miami, practicing in the areas of products liability and asbestos defense litigation. Stephen A. Taylor announced the opening of Stephen A. Taylor, P.L. with office located at 1500 San Remo Avenue, Suite 130, Coral Gables 33146; phone (305)722-0091; fax (305) 513-5763. Taylor’s main practice areas are estate planning, probate, and elder law. Chantal Guilbert Hook joined Rogers Towers in Jacksonville as an associate. Hook joined the firm’s estate planning practice group and practices in the areas of wills, trusts, the administration of estates, the taxation of estates, gifts and generation-skipping transfers, asset protection planning, and general business and real estate matters. Humphries & Oberdier, P.A. relocated their offices to 6620 Southpoint Dr. South, Suite 200, Jacksonville 32216. Loren Fender joined Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell P.A. as an associate, practicing in the areas of insurance defense matters and products liability. December 15, 2004 On the Move December 15, 2004 On the Movelast_img read more

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Cops Probe 3 Armed Home Invasions on Long Island in 3 Days

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau police released this sketch of one of the suspects in the New Cassel case.Authorities are investigating three armed home invasions over President’s Day weekend, including one in which shots were fired and another in which the suspect pretended to be a victim in need of help, Nassau and Suffolk county police said.In the first case, a man knocked on the door of a Mastic home on Mastic Boulevard and told the woman who answered the door that he was hit by a car at 7:15 a.m. Saturday, Suffolk police said.last_img

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Business parks: Mind the gap

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img