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Sports arena in CSUN panel’s five-year plan

first_imgCalifornia State University, Northridge, has a new plan for its athletic department and for the first time, the possibility of a new arena is on paper. The Blue Ribbon Commission, formed at the request of university President Jolene Koester, mapped out a five-year future for an athletics program that desperately needs a boost in performance, support and facilities. The commission announced its recommendations Thursday in Redwood Hall, although interestingly enough, there was no talk of an arena at the reception. However, a plan for an arena – which wouldn’t materialize for at least a decade – is in the commission’s findings in black and white. The plan, which is to be executed over the next five to seven years, states that planning should begin for a “multipurpose athletic and student recreation center facility on the main campus, one that would benefit all students. The commission was unanimous in supporting construction of such a facility within the next 10-12 years, provided the necessary student fee and donor support is forthcoming.” The arena plan was light on details, as it’s clearly in the infancy stage, but Mo Qayoumi, who chairs the commission, is expected to map out a specific plan for that and all of the recommendations. “The commission was certainly supportive and unanimous about the long-term need for a multipurpose arena,” Koester said while watching the CSUN men’s basketball game. “I don’t think anyone would dispute that it would add a measure of quality to intercollegiate athletics and the university. We need to play and lay a groundwork and have conversations and look toward that.” The commission is charged with improving support internally and externally, facilities and the success of the overall athletic program. Headlining proposed changes is the possibility of a new athletics logo. The 13-member commission included former NCAA President Cedric Dempsey and University of California, Los Angeles, athletic director Dan Guerrero. “What I found was a collection of individuals who care very deeply about the university and who want to see this athletic program become an integral part of the fabric of the success of this university,” Guerrero said. Athletic director update: An athletic director to carry out the new plan has yet to be named. An athletic director search committee recently was formed and prospective candidates could be on campus in April. Interim athletic director Janet Lucas is a candidate. Peggy Jennings, associated vice president of faculty affairs, is the chairwoman of the search committee, whose members are Charton, Pierre Tada, a member of the CSUN Foundation board of directors; Ron McIntyre, faculty president; Michael Neubauer, the chairman of the Intercollegiate Athletics Advisory Council; and Barbara Gross, a member of the Intercollegiate Athletics Advisory Council. Staff Writer Ramona Shelburne contributed to this story. Jill Painter, (818) 713-3615 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant The Matadors, perhaps, have finally found a way to get an arena, which is to combine it with a student recreation center. CSUN doesn’t have a full-blown student recreation center although the Associated Students has talked about the need for one over the past few years, but never really pursued it. “I definitely think it’s an important component of advancing the interests of the athletic program and also the student body,” said Chad Charton, president of the Associated Students. “The hard part is that it’s a 10-12-year time horizon and it certainly isn’t going to benefit students now. They can certainly come back as alumni and use the facilities but because of that, it’s hard to adopt the idea and take ownership as their own and not see or use it in their time. “Should students be excited? I think so. The reality is that as much as we’d like to agree to a rec center today and build tomorrow, that’s just not how it works.” CSUN has planned for a $100 million performing arts center, which appeared to be a blow to the athletic department. It’s not going to be a multiuse arena, but the Matadors might have found a multiuse arena after all. The Matadors play in the 1,600-seat Northridge gym, which is better suited for a high school campus. Basketball is the university’s flagship sport. There’s been minimal fundraising for athletics over the years, but former athletic director Dick Dull was reassigned to head that endeavor. last_img read more

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Mailbag: who’s to blame for the Sharks current losing skid?

first_imgANAHEIM, Calif. — A four-game losing streak and shellacking from the Vegas Golden Knights provided for than enough fodder to re-ignite the season of anxiety in Sharks territory.Erik Karlsson missed his 10th straight game in Los Angeles on Thursday. Radim Simek is out indefinitely with a major-knee injury. Joe Pavelski is on the shelf now, as well, Logan Couture missed Thursday’s game with flu-like symptoms and the Sharks are looking down the barrel of a potential first-round playoff matchup …last_img

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49ers make move on DeForest Buckner’s contract

first_imgSANTA CLARA — Defensive tackle DeForest Buckner is arguably the 49ers’ best first-round draft pick of the past decade, and while they envision a long-term contract extension with him, they took the procedural step Wednesday of locking him in through 2020.The 49ers exercised the fifth-year option on Buckner, drafted seventh overall in 2016 by then-general manager Trent Baalke.Baalke’s successor, John Lynch, echoed Buckner’s recent stance on contract talks in that both sides don’t have a …last_img

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SA ‘ahead of schedule for 2010’

first_img“Working with other stakeholders such as the 2010 Local Organising Committee, we are glad to announce that we have made significant progress in pursuit of our goal to host a successful 2010 Fifa World Cup,” Motlanthe said. South Africa ‘on course’ Source: BuaNews “We have also started to pay focused attention to all the 2010 legacy projects, so that the facilities are used for the maximum benefit of our people and our country beyond 2010,” he said. South Africa will meet its infrastructure deadlines well ahead of the 2010 Fifa World Cup, Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe told Parliament in Cape Town this week. “We are, however, confident that the economic benefits flowing from the 2010 Fifa World Cup competition will soften some of the cutting effects of this economic crisis,” he said. There are only three matches left before the curtain is drawn on Fifa’s “Festival of Continental Champions” – a test run for staging the World Cup – and no major incidents have been reported. Budget overrunscenter_img He pointed out that oversight visits conducted by members of the inter-ministerial committee had helped to ensure that the government and other stakeholders met their deadlines on infrastructure programmes. Motlanthe cautioned, however, that budget overruns by some host cities, especially in light of the current economic difficulties, needed to be addressed urgently so as to ensure that their expenditure was within budget. Motlanthe said that if anything was needed to confirm South Africa’s readiness to host world soccer’s showpiece event, the Confederations Cup under way had demonstrated that the country was on course to meet its objectives. 25 June 2009 The tournament “has also helped us identify areas that require improvement to deliver the best World Cup ever,” Motlanthe said, adding that the government was convinced that Bafana Bafana would continue improving ahead of 2010. The government had also noted concerns over delays in the construction of the Mbombela Stadium in Nelspruit, Mpumalanga, and discussions with the affected parties were taking place to resolve all outstanding matters.last_img read more

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Look how far we’ve come: Two decades of freedom

first_imgApartheid denied South Africans the right to vote, to work, to access education, to move freely, to love and marry who they wanted, and more. Freedom Day – 27 April 1994 – changed all that. We look at how far we’ve come.There are two entrances to the Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg − one for whites and another for non-whites. This was the reality during apartheid. (Image: Brand South Africa)Brand South Africa reporterApartheid legislation denied people the right to vote, to work, to access education, to move freely, to love and marry who they wanted, to be free of the fear of imprisonment without trial.Freedom Day – 27 April 1994 – changed all that. It ushered in a new constitutional democracy, underpinned by a groundbreaking Bill of Rights. We take a look at how far we’ve come over two decades of freedom.Compared to the apartheid era, where the majority had no political rights and parties opposed to apartheid were banned, all South Africans now have the right to freedom of association and are free to make political choices and campaign for any political party or cause.Whereas the majority of South Africans were denied the right to vote during the apartheid era, every adult citizen now has the right to take part in free, fair and regular elections, the right to vote and to stand for public office and, if elected, to hold office.All South Africans have the right to assemble, demonstrate, picket and present petitions, as long as this is done peacefully.Under apartheid, journalists critical of the government were often harrassed, detained and even assassinated. Anti-apartheid publications always risked being banned. By contrast, all South Africans now have the right to freedom of expression.The press and other media can express themselves freely and there is academic freedom and freedom of scientific research.The Bill of Rights also makes provision for the right to access any information that is required for the exercise or protection of any rights. The freedom of expression does not extend to propaganda of war, incitement of imminent violence or advocacy of hatred based on race, ethnicity, gender or religion.Compared to the apartheid era, all South Africans are now equal before the law and have the right to equal protection and benefit of the law.Whereas during apartheid people were detained without trial, mainly for their political beliefs, all citizens now have the right to freedom and security of the person, which includes the right not to be detained without trial and not to be treated or punished in a cruel, inhuman or degrading way.Everyone who is detained has the right to be told the reason for their detention, and to legal representation. Everyone who is arrested for allegedly committing an offence has the right to remain silent and to a fair trial or hearing before a court.Watch US Supreme Court judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg extol the “great piece of work” that is South Africa’s Constitution:While the apartheid state sought to deprive the majority of South Africans of their citizenship and controlled their movement through oppressive pass laws and other means, no citizen may be deprived of citizenship and everyone has the right to freely move through the country, reside anywhere and hold a passport.Whereas the apartheid state reserved skilled jobs for white South Africans, all citizens now have the right to choose their trade, occupation or profession.All citizens have the right to fair labour practices, to form and join a trade union and participate in its activities and programmes and the right to engage in collective bargaining. No one may be subjected to slavery, servitude and forced labour.While access to education was racially determined during apartheid, all South Africans now have the right to basic education, including adult basic education, and to further education, which the state has sought to progressively make available and accessible.All South Africans now have the right to access health care, water and social security and appropriate social assistance if they are unable to support themselves and their dependants. No-one may be refused emergency medical treatment.Every child, regardless of race, has a right to basic nutrition, shelter, basic health services and social services. Every child also has the right to family care or parental care and to be protected from maltreatment, neglect, abuse or degradation and exploitative labour practices.Compared to the apartheid era, all citizens have the right to freedom of sexual orientation, conscience, religion, thought, belief and opinion.During apartheid, not only was same-sex marriage unheard of, but homosexuality was illegal. In 2006 South Africa became only the fifth country in the world to pass legislation allowing gay and lesbian people to marry – way ahead of so-called developed democracies such as Norway, Sweden and the UK.Apartheid’s “immorality” legislation also outlawed sex and marriage between people of different races. Today, all marriages concluded under any tradition, or any system of religious, person or family law, are recognised.Compared to the further oppression and discrimination women experienced during the apartheid era, they now have equal rights before the law, including the right to make decisions regarding reproduction.Source: South African Government websiteWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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USDA Announces Support for Farmers Impacted by Unjustified Retaliation and Trade Disruption

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest (Washington, D.C., May 23, 2019) – U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will take several actions to assist farmers in response to trade damage from unjustified retaliation and trade disruption. President Trump directed Secretary Perdue to craft a relief strategy to support American agricultural producers while the Administration continues to work on free, fair, and reciprocal trade deals to open more markets in the long run to help American farmers compete globally. Specifically, the President has authorized USDA to provide up to $16 billion in programs, which is in line with the estimated impacts of unjustified retaliatory tariffs on U.S. agricultural goods and other trade disruptions. These programs will assist agricultural producers while President Trump works to address long-standing market access barriers.“China hasn’t played by the rules for a long time and President Trump is standing up to them, sending the clear message that the United States will no longer tolerate their unfair trade practices, which include non-tariff trade barriers and the theft of intellectual property. President Trump has great affection for America’s farmers and ranchers, and he knows they are bearing the brunt of these trade disputes. In fact, I’ve never known of a president that has been more concerned or interested in farmer wellbeing and long-term profitability than President Trump,” said Secretary Perdue. “The plan we are announcing today ensures farmers do not bear the brunt of unfair retaliatory tariffs imposed by China and other trading partners. Our team at USDA reflected on what worked well and gathered feedback on last year’s program to make this one even stronger and more effective for farmers. Our farmers work hard, are the most productive in the world, and we aim to match their enthusiasm and patriotism as we support them.”Listen to Secretary Perdue’s comments about the announcement:Background:American farmers have dealt with unjustified retaliatory tariffs and years of non-tariff trade disruptions, which have curtailed U.S. exports to China. Trade damages from such retaliation and market distortions have impacted a host of U.S. commodities, including crops like soybeans, corn, wheat, cotton, rice, and sorghum; livestock products like milk and pork; and many fruits, nuts, and other crops. High tariffs disrupt normal marketing patterns, raising costs by forcing commodities to find new markets. Additionally, American goods shipped to China have been slowed from reaching market by unusually strict or cumbersome entry procedures, which affect the quality and marketability of perishable crops. These boost marketing costs and unfairly affect our producers. USDA will use the following programs to assist farmers:Market Facilitation Program (MFP) for 2019, authorized under the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) Charter Act and administered by the Farm Service Agency (FSA), will provide $14.5 billion in direct payments to producers.Producers of alfalfa hay, barley, canola, corn, crambe, dry peas, extra-long staple cotton, flaxseed, lentils, long grain and medium grain rice, mustard seed, dried beans, oats, peanuts, rapeseed, safflower, sesame seed, small and large chickpeas, sorghum, soybeans, sunflower seed, temperate japonica rice, upland cotton, and wheat will receive a payment based on a single county rate multiplied by a farm’s total plantings to those crops in aggregate in 2019. Those per acre payments are not dependent on which of those crops are planted in 2019, and therefore will not distort planting decisions. Moreover, total payment-eligible plantings cannot exceed total 2018 plantings.Dairy producers will receive a per hundredweight payment on production history and hog producers will receive a payment based on hog and pig inventory for a later-specified time frame.Tree nut producers, fresh sweet cherry producers, cranberry producers, and fresh grape producers will receive a payment based on 2019 acres of production.These payments will help farmers to absorb some of the additional costs of managing disrupted markets, to deal with surplus commodities, and to expand and develop new markets at home and abroad.Payments will be made in up to three tranches, with the second and third tranches evaluated as market conditions and trade opportunities dictate. The first tranche will begin in late July/early August as soon as practical after Farm Service Agency crop reporting is completed by July 15th. If conditions warrant, the second and third tranches will be made in November and early January.Additionally, CCC Charter Act authority will be used to implement a $1.4 billion Food Purchase and Distribution Program (FPDP) through the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) to purchase surplus commodities affected by trade retaliation such as fruits, vegetables, some processed foods, beef, pork, lamb, poultry, and milk for distribution by the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) to food banks, schools, and other outlets serving low-income individuals.Finally, the CCC will use its Charter Act authority for $100 million to be issued through the Agricultural Trade Promotion Program (ATP) administered by the Foreign Agriculture Service (FAS) to assist in developing new export markets on behalf of producers.Further details regarding eligibility and payment rates will be released at a later date.#USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender.last_img read more